Four hour waiting time for acute psychiatric care urged

BMJ, 9 February 2016

A new waiting time target for admission to acute psychiatric care of four hours should be introduced, a commission convened by the Royal College of Psychiatrists has said…

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Independent Commission led by Lord Nigel Crisp and supported by the Royal College of Psychiatrists

NHS Confederation, 9 February 2016

Rapid access to acute care and an end to sending acutely unwell mental health patients long distances are among the recommendations made in a new report launched today by an Independent Commission led by Lord Nigel Crisp and supported by the Royal College of Psychiatrists….

Click here to read the full story.

Click here to read the report.

Effect of structured physical activity on prevention of serious fall injuries in adults aged 70-89: randomized clinical trial (LIFE Study)

BMJ, 3 February 2016

This study aims to test whether a long term, structured physical activity program compared with a health education program reduces the risk of serious fall injuries among sedentary older people with functional limitations.

The paper concludes that in this trial, which was underpowered to detect small, but possibly important reductions in serious fall injuries, a structured physical activity program compared with a health education program did not reduce the risk of serious fall injuries among sedentary older people with functional limitations. These null results were accompanied by suggestive evidence that the physical activity program may reduce the rate of fall related fractures and hospital admissions in men.

Click here to view the full text paper.

Important message: British National Formulary (BNF70) and the Children’s British National Formulary (BNFC 2015)

British National Formulary, February 2016

Please be advised that due to errors contained within the previously distributed hard copy version of the British National Formulary (BNF70) and the BNFC (2015) that serious patient safety incidents have been reported through the national reporting and learning system (NRLS).

An adhesive addendum will be produced at the end of February to be placed on the front of all hard copies and where Trusts have distributed copies in house, they should consider re-calling all copies.

All Practitioners are reminded that the most current up to date accurate version of the BNF and BNFC can be accessed via the electronic site here.

You can also access this via the following links

·         Via Medicines complete – please click here for further details

·         Via NICE evidence summaries – please click here

·         Via NICE BNF app – please click here for further details

Behavioural insights and health

Local Government Association, January 2016

There is a variety of ways that people can be supported to make better choices. Councils are demonstrating this through the way they are making use of behavioural insights to improve health. From exploiting digital technologies to stressing social norms in a bid to encourage people to make lifestyle changes, local authorities have started using behavioural insights to make a difference to people’s lives.

Click here to download the report.

Briefing on the findings of the Confidential Inquiry into premature deaths of people with a learning disability

Mencap, January 2016

This research finds that 1,238 children and adults die across England every year because they are not getting the right health care.  The research is a national estimate based on the findings of the Confidential Inquiry into premature deaths of people with a learning disability.  The key recommendation from the inquiry team is for the establishment and funding of a National Learning Disability Mortality Review Body in England. This would allow for the continued collection of mortality data for people with a learning disability and investigation of the most serious cases.

Click here to read the briefing.