Social Skills & Schizophrenia – A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Research on Social Skills Training for Schizophrenia.

A Meta-Analysis of Controlled Research on Social Skills Training for Schizophrenia, Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology. 76(3):491-504, June 2008

Abstract:   A meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials of social skills training for schizophrenia was conducted. Outcome measures from 22 studies including 1,521 clients were categorized according to a proximal-distal continuum in relation to the presumed site of action of skills training interventions, with content mastery tests and performance-based measures of skills assumed to be most proximal, community functioning and negative symptoms intermediate, and general symptoms and relapse most distal. Results reveal a large weighted mean effect size for content-mastery exams (d = 1.20), a moderate mean effect size for performance-based measures of social and daily living skills (d = 0.52), moderate mean effect sizes for community functioning (d = 0.52) and negative symptoms (d = 0.40), and small mean effect sizes for other symptoms (d = 0.15) and relapse (d = 0.23). These results support the efficacy of social skills training for improving psychosocial functioning in schizophrenia.

For the full-text of this article please email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

Suicide – Feeling our way in the dark: The psychiatric nursing care of suicidal people—A literature review

Feeling our way in the dark: The psychiatric nursing care of suicidal people—A literature review, International Journal of Nursing Studies, Volume 45, Issue 6, June 2008, Pages 942-953

Abstract:

Psychiatric/Mental Health nurses have a long history of being front-line carers of suicidal people, and yet the international epidemiological literature, methodological problems notwithstanding, suggests that contemporary care practices for suicidal people have much room for improvement. As a result, this paper focuses on several areas/issuesnext term of care of the suicidal person, and in so doing, critiques the extant literature, such as it is. This critique illustrates that there is a disconcerting lack of empirically induced theory to guide practice and even less empirical evidence to support-specific interventions. The paper concludes, accepting the axiomatic complexity and multi-dimensionality of previous termsuicide,next term and the undeniable fact that previous termsuicidenext term is a human drama, played out in the everyday lives of people, that for Psychiatric/Mental Health nurses, caring for suicidal people must be an interpersonal endeavor; and one personified by talking and listening.

For the full-text of this journal article please email; susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

Forensic – Assessment of risk and special observations in mental health practice: A comparison of forensic and non-forensic settings

Assessment of risk and special observations in mental health practice: A comparison of forensic and non-forensic settings,  International Journal of Mental Health Nursing
Volume 15, Issue 4, Date: December 2006, Pages: 235-241

Elizabeth Whitehead and Tom Mason,  School of Health and Social Care, University of Chester, Chester, UK

Abstract:  The use of special observations in psychiatric practice may be employed as an alternative to more restrictive methods such as the use of seclusion and restraint. From the literature, special observations are used for a complex array of signs and symptoms (and risk behaviours) which include suicidal intent, self-injurious behaviour, hallucinatory experiences, and absconding. This paper reports on research into the use of special observations in both forensic and non-forensic psychiatric settings. A comparative approach was adopted to establish if the perceived risk factors leading to the adoption of special observations were similar in both settings. Three groups of nursing staff were requested to assess 30 patients who were placed on special observations. Before this, nurses were requested to rate the risk factors in terms of their severity on a 7-point Likert scale. The rank-ordering analysis revealed a similarity of identified risk factors and anova (one-way, unrelated) and the Jonckheere Trend Test revealed that there were significant differences between the scores in the forensic and the non-forensic settings. The statistical differences existed for risk factors relating to harm to self and others but not for psychiatric symptomatology.

For the full-text of this article please email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

Mindfulness – Using mindfulness-based therapeutic interventions in psychiatric nursing practice-part I: Description and empirical support for mindfulness-based interventions

Using mindfulness-based therapeutic interventions in psychiatric nursing practice-part I: Description and empirical support for mindfulness-based interventions , Archives of Psychiatric Nursing, Volume 18, Issue 5, October 2004, Pages 164-169

Abstract:

Finding effective nursing interventions for the treatment of mental illness is a major concern for advanced practice psychiatric nurses (APPN). Increasingly, innovative psychotherapeutic treatment modalities are being used for the treatment of individuals with seriuos mental illness. One such innovative approach, mindfulness-based therapeutic interventions, has been shown to relieve distress for individuals with medical and psychiatric illnesses. In part one of this two-part article, the investigators describe principle concepts of mindfulness, review current research in the usefulness of mindfulness practice for treatment of psychiatric illnesses, and outline the theoretical basis for this treatment modality, including mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT). In Part II, the writers detail the therapy phases of MBCT and present a clinical case in which an advance practice psychiatric nurse integrates mindfulness-based psychotherapeutic approaches into her treatment. This clinical case may inform future clinical nursing research and advanced psychiatric nursing practice.

For the full-text of this article please email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

Mindfulness – Using mindfulness-based therapeutic interventions in psychiatric nursing practice-part II: Mindfulness-based approaches for all phases of psychotherapy-clinical case study

Using mindfulness-based therapeutic interventions in psychiatric nursing practice-part II: Mindfulness-based approaches for all phases of psychotherapy-clinical case study, Archives of Psychiatric NursingVolume 18, Issue 5,  October 2004, Pages 170-177

Abstract:

In Part I of this two-part article, the authors described principle concepts of mindfulness, reviewed current research in the usefulness of mindfulness practice for treatment of psychiatric illnesses. The structure and content of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) was also outlined and provided the theoretical basis for this treatment approach. This alternative therapeutic approach offers potential usefulness for the treatment of individuals suffering from mental illness. Part II of this article presents a more detailed explanation of mindfulness-based therapeutic approaches for all phases of psychotherapy and identifies relevant research questions that will provide an empirical base to guide clinical practice. A case study illustrates mindfulness-based therapeutic interventions.

For the full-text of this article please email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

Alzheimer’s Latest News – New drug may halt Alzheimer’s progress

New drug may halt Alzheimer’s progress. 29th July 2008 from the Alzheimer’s Research Trust

British scientists have discovered a treatment that appears to slow the progress of Alzheimer’s disease by 81%.

Professor Claude Wischik and colleagues from the University of Aberdeen and TauRx Therapeutics, where he is Chairman, used the drug rember (methylthionium chloride) to act on the tangles present in brains with Alzheimer’s disease.

In the largest ever Phase II clinical trial of a disease modifying treatment, 321 patients with mild and moderate Alzheimer’s disease in the UK and Singapore were found to experience an 81% reduction in cognitive decline over one year when treated with rember. There was no significant decline in mental function over 19 months.

Patient Information – Self-Help Guides

    The new Lancashire Care Patient Information site is now under development. Information and resources will be continually added over the next few weeks …..  If you need to give out information to Patients and are looking for accredited, up-to-date information look no further than the new site.

On site now is:

Self-Help GuidesClick on the title to gain full-text pdf file, for printing or download

12 Steps to Positive Mental Heatlh

CVS East Lancashire – Downloadable Directory coming soon ..