Improving Access to Psychological Therapies and Learning Disabilities

Foundation for People with Learning Disabilities, October 2014

This study explores the relationships between the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme in England and people with learning disabilities and the people and services that support these service users.  The study sets out to answer the following questions:

1. What are the barriers and facilitators facing people with learning disabilities in
accessing IAPT? How do these relate to the views, practices and service delivery
models described by IAPT and specialist learning disability staff in England?
2. What are the strategies and practices that staff employ to support people with
learning disabilities to make good use of IAPT services?
3. What advances are needed at the level of individual staff capabilities, service
delivery models, management, commissioning and policy development to
ensure equitable access to IAPT for people with learning disabilities?

Click here to download the report.

Psychological therapies and parity of esteem: from commitment to reality

British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy, December 2014

This report, by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), looks at how to make parity of esteem a reality in relation to NHS psychological therapy services. It includes the views of service users in need of, or in receipt of, psychological therapy, as well as the practitioners and organisations involved in its delivery.

The report looks at the overall provision of psychological therapy in the NHS and has a specific focus on primary care, as this is the setting for the delivery of the majority of psychological therapy services and is usually the first port of call for those with psychosocial problems.  Much of the information available on psychological therapies in primary care is from IAPT services, but the recommendations made in the report are for all psychological therapy services funded and provided by the NHS, within and alongside IAPT.

Click here to read the full report.

Is there a role for Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners and Primary Care Mental Health Workers in the delivery of low intensity cognitive behavioural therapy for individuals who self-harm?

Is there a role for Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners and Primary Care Mental Health Workers in the delivery of low intensity cognitive behavioural therapy for individuals who self-harm? Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, The, 2011, Vol. 6 Issue: 4 pp. 165-174

Hayley Williams, – Primary Care Mental Health Worker at Lancashire Care Foundation Trust, Preston, UK

Abstract:

The aim of this paper is to explore how the role of low intensity cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) could be incorporated as a treatment option for individuals who engage in non-suicidal self-injury. Primary Care Mental Health Workers (PCMHWs) and Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners (PWPs) are employed to assist patients experiencing common mental health problems through CBT-based self-help materials; this is commonly referred to as low intensity CBT.

This article reviews the literature in order to investigate how these workers could incorporate their skills to offer support to those who self-harm as means of coping with psychological distress.

Findings – The findings from this review identify a call for research into the efficacy of low intensity CBT, to enable the dissemination of clear guidance into the treatment of non-suicidal self-injury, considering the role of PWPs and PCMHWs.

Originality/value – At present, there is a lack of guidance into the treatment options for people who participate in non-suicidal self-injury. There is ambiguity into how PWPs and PCMHWs should manage this client base and training courses designed for these workers do not address the issues of self-harm. It is hoped that this article may promote the development of such protocols.

Lancashire Care staff can request the full-text of this paper, email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

Veterans & IAPT – Positive Practice Guide

IAPT Veterans Positive Practice Guide, 2009, IAPT

Click on the title above to access the full-text of this guide

Abstract:

There are around 200,000 regular serving personnel in the armed forces (HMF), 100,000 of whom are in the Army and 50,000 each in the Royal Navy and RAF. There are around 35,000 personnel in the reserve forces, a significant proportion of whom since 2003 have been deployed on active service alongside the regular forces. The make up of HMF is complex and heterogeneous.There are around 200,000 regular serving personnel in the armed forces (HMF), 100,000 of whom are in the Army and 50,000 each in the Royal Navy and RAF. There are around 35,000 personnel in the reserve forces, a significant proportion of whom since 2003 have been deployed on active service alongside the regular forces. The make up of HMF is complex and heterogeneous. ………..

Lancashire Care staff can either click on the link above or email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

Implementing NICE guidelines for the psychological treatment of depression and anxiety disorders: The IAPT experience

Implementing NICE guidelines for the psychological treatment of depression and anxiety disorders: The IAPT experience,  International Review of Psychiatry, 2011 Aug;23(4):318-27

Clark DM

University of Oxford , UK

Abstract:

 The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme is a large-scale initiative that aims to greatly increase the availability of NICE recommended psychological treatment for depression and anxiety disorders within the National Health Service in England. This article describes the background to the programme, the arguments on which it is based, the therapist training scheme, the clinical service model, and a summary of progress to date. At mid-point in a national roll-out of the programme progress is generally in line with expectation, and a large number of people who would not otherwise have had the opportunity to receive evidence-based psychological treatment have accessed, and benefited from, the new IAPT services. Planned future developments and challenges for the programme are briefly described.

Lancashire Care staff can request the full-text of this paper, email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) model raises many questions – Where does mental health nursing fit in primary care?

Where does mental health nursing fit in primary care? Nursing Times; 2011, 107: 45, 24-25

Jude Caie is mental health nurse therapist, Manchester Mental Health and Social Care Trust, HMP Manchester, Manchester, UK

Abstract:

The introduction of the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies scheme in primary mental health care has raised questions about mental health nurses’ role and function. This article considers some of the key questions around where and indeed whether nursing continues to have a place within primary mental health care.

KEY POINTS

 

  1. The remit of Imp
  2. Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) is to provide timely and time-limited therapy
  3. New roles in the IAPT framework mean nurses can access new training
  4. Becoming part of the IAPT structure could give mental health nurses the opportunity to have their skills formally recognised
  5. It is up to individual mental health nurses to decide whether they can work within an IAPT model
  6. Nursing must fight to survive and establish its place within a changing healthcare environment

 

Lancashire Care staff can request the full-text of this paper, email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk

IAPT – Role Transition from Mental Health Nurse to IAPT High Intensity Psychological Therapist

Role Transition from Mental Health Nurse to IAPT High Intensity Psychological Therapist, Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapy, early view, 2011

Simon Robinson, Stephen Kellett, Ingrid King and Val Keating

South West Yorkshire Partnership NHS Foundation Trust, UK

Centre for Psychological Services Research, University of Sheffield, and Sheffield Social and Healthcare NHS Foundation Trust, UK

Abstract:

Background: The Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative has depended on the training of a new NHS mental health workforce. At step 3 of the stepped care model, capacity building has required the recruitment of a wide range of mental health professionals into high intensity therapists training posts. This shift naturally entails role transition on the part of trainees into delivering cognitive behavioural psychotherapy (CBP), but no previous research has examined the experience of such transitions. Aim: To describe the lived experience of transition from mental health nurse to IAPT high intensity therapist and to identify possible factors which moderate effective role conversions. Method: Six qualified high intensity therapists were interviewed using a semi-structured interview and the subsequent interviews transcribed. Thematic content analysis (TCA) was used to analyze personal accounts of role transition. All participants had previously been mental health nurses and attended the same IAPT high intensity therapist (HIT) training programme. Results: Six key themes were apparent from the TCA. Three interconnected themes concerning supervision (style, impact of approach and historical context) and three additional themes of the challenge of learning a new clinical approach, high need for support, and forming a new psychotherapist identity. Conclusions: Findings suggest supervision is the most important factor in supporting complex psychotherapy role transitions. Clinical supervisors may need to incorporate dedicated time on role and identity shift during CBP training to ensure effective assimilation and transition. Methodological short-comings are identified and discussed.

Lancashire care staff can request the full-text of this paper, email: susan.jennings@lancashirecare.nhs.uk