Beverage purchases from stores in Mexico under the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages: observational study

BMJ, 6 January 2016

This study looks at the effect on purchases of beverages from stores in Mexico one year after implementation of the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages.

The study finds that the tax on sugar sweetened beverages was associated with reductions in purchases of taxed beverages and increases in purchases of untaxed beverages. Continued monitoring is needed to understand purchases longer term, potential substitutions, and health implications.

Click here to read the full article.

Tipping the scales: why preventing obesity makes economic sense

The King’s Fund, January 2016

This report, written with Cancer Research UK, finds that rising rates of obesity could lead to 700,000 new cancer cases in the UK, as well as millions of new cases of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke. This would cost the NHS an additional £2.5 billion a year by 2035, over and above what is already spent on obesity related disease. However, the study shows that small changes can have dramatic impacts – for example, a one per cent reduction in the number of overweight or obese people every year could prevent more than 64,000 cancer cases over the next 20 years and save the NHS £300 million in 2035 alone.

Click here to read the full report.

Click here to read the executive summary.

Fat chance? Exploring the evidence on who becomes obese

202 Health, November 2015

This report examines current knowledge and data on obesity, addresses the question: ‘Who exactly is becoming obese?’ It shows that many factors, including parental weight, access to green spaces and the safety of roads have a strong influence on obesity rates in children and must be considered.

Click here to read the full report.

Making Every Contact Count – Bulletin

Lancashire Care Library and Information Service

This Library bulletin provides further reading to support the ‘Making Every Contact Count’ programme.

There are links to recent research papers and articles in each of the MECC areas to give you further background information and evidence to consolidate what you have learned in your training, and to give you ideas and confidence for practising MECC in your day-to-day encounters.  The section on smoking cessation includes a Cochrane review about interventions to increase adherence to medications for tobacco dependence and what PHE says about e-cigarettes. There are peer-reviewed articles about different diets for weight loss and a study exploring alcohol intake and cancer risk, as well as articles on how to start a MECC conversation.

Click here to view the bulletin.

You will need to login with your Athens account to view the articles in this bulletin unless it is indicated that they are “Open Access”.  All LCFT staff and students are eligible to register for an Athens account.  Please click here to register for an account or contact the Library.

 

Poor Beginnings: Health inequalities among young children across England

National Children’s Bureau, September 2015

This report is based on official data published by Public Health England and it looks at four key measures of young children’s health and wellbeing: obesity, tooth decay, accidental injury and school readiness. It picture of the health of children under five years old living in England and shows how growing up in different areas of the country can have an impact on the likelihood of experiencing a poor health outcome before starting school.

Click here to view the full report.

Food for Thought: Promoting Healthy Diets Among Children and Young People

British Medical Association, July 2015

This report sets out the measures needed to help promote healthier diets among children and young people. It makes recommendations for the improvement of promotion of healthy behaviours including: improving knowledge and attitudes towards healthy eating; the limitation of unhealthy cues and promotion of unhealthy food and drink; and international co-operation on nutrition.

Click here to download the full report.

Click here to download the summary.