On measuring the number of vulnerable children in England

Children’s Commissioner, July 2017

This analysis from the Children’s Commissioner for England aims to report on the scale of vulnerability among children in England.  The initial analysis has found that over half a million children so vulnerable that the state has to step in, 670,000 children in England are growing up in ‘high risk’ family situations and 800,000 children are suffering from mental health difficulties.

Click here to view the full report.

Facilities for child and adolescent mental health services (HBN 03-02)

Department of Health, June 2017

This guidance covers the design of child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) accommodation for children and young people aged up to 18 years.

It provides full descriptions of rooms that are specific to CAMHS and are not contained in other health building notes (HBNs).

You can use the schedule of accommodation to calculate local project-specific requirements.

You can use the stakeholder needs and quality of life checklists to assess scheme compliance.

Click here to access the guidance.

A Mental Health Act fit for tomorrow: an agenda for reform

Mental Health Alliance, June 2017

This report summarises the findings of a survey of over 8000 people who use mental health services, carers, and professionals working in the field. The report highlights concerns that the Mental Health Act overlooks the dignity and human rights of people with mental illness.  The Mental Health Alliance, made up of over 75 organisations working in the mental health sector, commissioned the research and is calling on the Government to urgently act on its promise made in the run up to the General Election to review the Act, and ensure any reform takes into account the views expressed by those people it’s there to protect.

Click here to read the full report.

A trade in people: the inpatient healthcare economy for people with learning disabilities and/or autism spectrum disorder

Centre for Disability Research, University of Lancaster (CeDR), June 2017

This report finds that around half of inpatient services for people with learning disabilities or autism are being run by the independent sector rather than the NHS. Over a quarter of a billion pounds of public money every year is being paid to independent sector companies to run these services.  The report calls for greater scrutiny of these independently provided services to ensure they are providing a high quality of care.

Click here to view this report.