Health and social care integration

National Audit Office, February 2017

This report warns that progress with integration of health and social care has, to date, been slower and less successful than envisaged and has not delivered all of the expected benefits for patients, the NHS or local authorities. As a result, the government’s plan for integrated health and social care services across England by 2020 is at significant risk.  The report also finds that  The Better Care Fund has not achieved the expected value for money, in terms of savings, outcomes for patients or hospital activity.

Click here to view the report.

Improving outcomes for children and families in the early years: a key role for health visiting services

Local Government Association, February 2017

These case studies published in collaboration with the Institute of Health Visiting explore how integrating health visiting with other services such as children’s centres, early help, safeguarding and public health teams, can provide better support to children and their families. However, the report also raises concerns regarding health visitor posts being cut as a consequence of the reductions to local government funding.

Click here to view the full report.

Fatherhood: the impact of fathers on children’s mental health

Centre for Mental Health, February 2017

This briefing reviews evidence about the role of fathers in children’s mental health. It finds evidence that fathers have a big influence on their children’s mental health yet few get any help or support to fulfil their potential as parents.

Click here to view the briefing.

Confidentiality: good practice in handling patient information

General Medical Council, January 2017

Following consultation, this guidance on confidentiality for doctors has been revised and updated. While the principles of the current guidance remain unchanged, it now clarifies various issues including the public protection responsibilities of doctors and the importance of sharing information for direct care. It also includes a decision-making flowchart and explanatory notes to show how the new guidance applies to situations doctors may encounter and find hard to deal with, such as reporting gunshot and knife wounds or disclosing information about serious communicable diseases.

Click here to view the guidance.

Cohort profile: the Scottish Research register SHARE. A register of people interested in research participation linked to NHS data sets

BMJ Open, Volume 7, Issue 2, 2017

Recruitment to trials is often difficult. Many trials fail to meet recruitment targets resulting in underpowered studies which waste resources and the time of those who participated. While there is evidence that many people are willing to take part in research, particularly if it involves a condition from which they suffer, researchers are unable to easily contact such people often relying on busy clinicians to identify them. Many clinicians perceive themselves as too busy to take part in research activities. The Scottish Health Research Register SHARE adopts an approach which asks the public to consent to their data held in National Health Service databases to be used to determine their suitability for research projects. Additionally, participants can consent for spare blood, left after routine venepuncture to be automatically identified in the laboratory and stored for future research studies.

Click here to view the full text article.

Pioneering venture launched to help solve ‘capital finance conundrum’

NHS Confederation, February 2017

A pioneering new initiative is set to radically transform NHS organisations’ ability to tap into local economic opportunities.

The Local Growth Academy, an exciting cross-sectoral venture, has been launched to help NHS organisations understand how to access the new and emerging finance mechanisms determining local infrastructure planning…

Click here to read the full story.