Library Mental Health Bulletins

The Gosall Library, June 2018

This week’s Library bulletins are on Suicide Prevention and Recovery.

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Places, spaces and wellbeing

What Works Wellbeing, June 2018

Evidence review from What Works Wellbeing that considers the global evidence base for improving people’s wellbeing through changes to the community infrastructure. This covers:

  • Public places and ‘bumping’ places designed for people to meet, including streets, squares, parks, play areas, village halls and community centres.
  • Places where people meet informally or are used as meeting places, such as cafes, pubs, libraries, schools and churches.
  • Services that can facilitate access to places to meet, including urban design, landscape architecture and public art, transport, public health organisations, subsidised housing sites, and bus routes.

The focus of our review has been on interventions operating at the neighbourhood level rather than city or national level. Virtual spaces, are our of the scope of this review, there is a growing evidence base though on their value.

Click here to view the full report.

Asleep on the job: Costs of inadequate sleep in Australia

Sleep Health Foundation, June 2018

This report written with Deloitte addresses the economic cost of inadequate sleep in Australia, in order to raise awareness of the economic cost of inadequate sleep in Australia.  Inadequate sleep includes excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and subjective complaint of insufficient sleep. Sleep is essential for effective mental and metabolic functioning, and the consequences of inadequate sleep can be far worse than just tiredness. Sleep disorders such as insomnia, restless legs syndrome (RLS) and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) can cause heart disease, obesity, depression and a range of other serious health conditions. Inadequate sleep can also directly lead to fatality – for example if it leads to sleep while driving.   The report suggests that the economic cost is:

  • health system costs of $1.8 billion, or $246 per person with inadequate sleep;
  • productivity losses of $17.9 billion, or $2,418 per person with inadequate sleep;
  • informal care costs of $0.6 billion, or $82 per person with inadequate sleep; and
  • other financial costs, including deadweight losses, of $5.9 billion, or $802 per person with inadequate sleep.

It also estimates that there will be almost a quarter of million disability adjusted life years (DALYs) (228,162) incurred in Australia in 2016-17 due to inadequate sleep, representing $40.1 billion in lost wellbeing.

Click here to view the full report.

Start Well: Stay Well – a model to support new starters: Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

NHS Employers, June 2018

The Start Well: Stay Well model formalises the approach to meeting, greeting and supporting all new starters. It engages with new starters at various touch points, including on appointment and before they arrive at CUH as part of the on-boarding process. A key feature of the model was employee buddies; the ambition was that all new starters, clinical and non-clinical, would be assigned a buddy on their first day. The theatres teams embraced this approach and installed photo posters in their areas to ensure named buddies were visible to all.  Integral to the model is a hi-5 moment approach, which comprises of a high impact, high energy, high importance contact with staff which can be delivered in five minutes. This is built around five open questions:

  • How are you today?
  • How is your induction going?
  • How are you settling in?
  • How can the team help?
  • How can I help?

Click here to view the full report.

That Age Old Question

Royal Society for Public Health, June 2018

Royal Society for Public Health report that reveals that ageist views are held across the generations, and that an ageing society is viewed by many as a challenge rather than an opportunity. We are making a number of recommendations aimed at addressing some of the key drivers and negative consequences of societal ageism. It calls for:

  • Bringing services such as nurseries, youth clubs, and care homes under the same roof
  • Positive ageing to be addressed within schools
  • Employers and government to support employee wellbeing and resilience in preparation for later life
  • Employers and government to promote age diversity in workplaces
  • Healthcare professionals to be trained on the effects of ageism in clinical and care settings
  • Ageing and ageism in wider society
  • An independent review of the representation of older people in the media
  • The Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO) to include “age” in the
  • Editors’ Code of Practice as a characteristic by which journalists must not discriminate
  • Facebook to include “age” as a protected characteristic in its community standards on hate speech
  • An end to the use of the term “anti-ageing” in the cosmetics and beauty industries

Click here to view the report.

System under strain: Why demand pressures are more than a winter phenomenon

NHS Confederation, June 2018

NHS Confederation report describing ways in which increasing demand in one part of the system can affect the performance of other NHS services elsewhere.  It notes that rising demand is not confided to winter and outlines how some NHS and social care providers have adapted their services to enable patients and service users to access care more efficiently.

Click here to view the full report.

Posted in NHS

Tobacco Control Plan delivery plan 2017 to 2022

Department of Health and Social Care, June 2018

This delivery plan will monitor how the aims of the tobacco control plan for England are being met. specific milestones and what is expected at national and local levels. It includes actions for:

  • government departments
  • national agencies
  • local partnerships

The plan will be updated as new actions are identified and existing ones are completed.

Click here to view the report.