Domestic Abuse Pocket Guide

Royal College of Nursing, May 2017

Domestic abuse is a significant safeguarding issue in all societies and is a challenging issue for everyone. This guide has been developed in response to the recognition by the RCN of the need for nurses, midwives and health care support workers and all health care professionals to have an understanding of the impact of the domestic abuse of patients, clients and colleagues.

Click here to view the guidance.

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Responding to domestic abuse: a resource for health professionals

Department of Health, March 2017

This resource looks at how health professionals can support adults and young people over 16 who are experiencing domestic abuse, and dependent children in their households.

It will help health staff to identify potential victims, initiate sensitive routine enquiry and respond effectively to disclosures of abuse.

Click here to view the resource.

Beyond adversity: Addressing the mental health needs of young people who face complexity and adversity in their lives

Young Minds, July 2016

The report suggests that schools, social workers, police and NHS staff may be inadvertently re-traumatising vulnerable children because of fundamental misunderstandings about their behaviour.

Children who have been neglected, abused, bereaved or faced prejudice may communicate their feelings by being aggressive, self-destructive, withdrawn or highly sexualised. As a result, they are often treated as ‘the problem.’

This means the cause of their trauma is never addressed and they don’t receive the mental health care they need.  Beyond Adversity calls on the Government, and the NHS, to keep their commitments to all of these children. It makes concrete policy and service recommendations aiming to promote trauma-informed and culturally sensitive services.

Click here to read the full report.

Time for Change – the Challenge Ahead

ACEVO, February 2016

May 2016 will mark the 5th anniversary of the Panorama programme which exposed abuse and neglect at Winterbourne View Hospital, a private assessment and treatment unit (ATU) for people with learning disabilities and/or autism. This report looks at the actions taken so far and calling on partners, including CQC, to demonstrate how they are helping to reduce the reliance on hospital-based settings for people with learning disabilities.

 

Click here to read the full report.

Adult safeguarding – Signs and indicators of abuse: At a glance 69

Social Care Institute for Excellence, January 2015

People with care and support needs, such as older people or people with disabilities, are more likely to be abused or neglected. They may be seen as an easy target and may be less likely to identify abuse themselves or to report it. People with communication difficulties can be particularly at risk because they may not be able to alert others. Sometimes people may not even be aware that they are being abused, and this is especially likely if they have a cognitive impairment. Abusers may try to prevent access to the person they abuse.

Signs of abuse can often be difficult to detect. This At a glance briefing aims to help people who come into contact with people with care and support needs to identify abuse and recognise possible indicators. Many types of abuse are also criminal offences and should be treated as such.

Types of abuse:

Physical abuse
Domestic violence or abuse
Sexual abuse
Psychological or emotional abuse
Financial or material abuse
Modern slavery
Discriminatory abuse
Organisational or institutional abuse
Neglect or acts of omission
Self-neglect or self-abuse

Click here to view the full briefing.

Winterbourne View – Time for Change: Transforming the commissioning of services for people with learning disabilities and/or autism

ACEVO, November 2014

This review – also known as the Bubb Report makes recommendations on a new commissioning framework for services to people with learning disabilities and/or autism who are currently in inappropriate hospital placements. The report recommends the creation of a Charter of Rights for people with learning disabilities and/or autism and their families to underpin commissioning. The Charter should include the right for people with learning disabilities and/or autism and their families to challenge’ decisions to admit or continue keeping them in inpatient care.

Click here to view the full report.