Tipping the scales: why preventing obesity makes economic sense

The King’s Fund, January 2016

This report, written with Cancer Research UK, finds that rising rates of obesity could lead to 700,000 new cancer cases in the UK, as well as millions of new cases of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke. This would cost the NHS an additional £2.5 billion a year by 2035, over and above what is already spent on obesity related disease. However, the study shows that small changes can have dramatic impacts – for example, a one per cent reduction in the number of overweight or obese people every year could prevent more than 64,000 cancer cases over the next 20 years and save the NHS £300 million in 2035 alone.

Click here to read the full report.

Click here to read the executive summary.

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Light to moderate intake of alcohol, drinking patterns, and risk of cancer: results from two prospective US cohort studies

BMJ, 18 August 2015

This study, incorporating two US prospective cohort studies, aims to quantify risk of overall cancer across all levels of alcohol consumption among women and men separately, with a focus on light to moderate drinking and never smokers; and assess the influence of drinking patterns on overall cancer risk.

Click here to access the full text paper.

Mental health inequalities in detection of breast cancer

British Journal of Psychiatry, December 2014

Women with a mental illness (including depression, anxiety and serious mental illnesses) are less likely to be screened for breast cancer, according to new research published in the BJPsych.  UK-based researchers from the Universities of Leicester and Greenwich reviewed 24 publications reporting breast cancer screening practices in women with mental illness (around 700,000), and five studies investigating screening for those in distress but who had not been diagnosed with a mental illness (nearly 21,500). Researchers found that there were significantly reduced rates of mammography screening in women with mental illness, depression and severe mental illness such as schizophrenia. The effect was not present in women with distress alone, suggesting distress was not the explanation. 

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