The Obsessive Compulsive Treatment Efficacy randomised controlled Trial (OCTET)

NIHR, September 2017

This NIHR-funded trial included 473 adults with moderate to severe obsessive-compulsive disorder who were already waiting to receive CBT. It found that offering people book-based or computer-based CBT whilst on a waiting list for therapist-led therapy did not improve their obsessive-compulsive symptoms when assessed after three or 12 months.

Click here to access the NIHR Signal.

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Sixty seconds on . . . CBT apps

BMJ, 7 September 2016

If you search online for “apps for depression” you’ll get more than a million hits. “People are starting to assume you can get therapy on a smartphone and we won’t need CBT to be provided by health services anymore,” explained Rona Moss-Morris, King’s College London professor of psychology as applied to medicine, at a media update on cognitive behavioural therapy this week. But most people, when asked, choose therapy from a person rather than an app, she said.

Click here to view the full text article.  You will need to login with your Athens account to access this article.

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Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) as treatment for depression in primary care (REEACT trial): large scale pragmatic randomised controlled trial

BMJ, 11 November 2015

This study assesses the effectiveness of supported computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) as an adjunct to usual primary care for adults with depression.

The study concludes that supported cCBT does not substantially improve depression outcomes compared with usual GP care alone. In this study, neither a commercially available nor free to use computerised CBT intervention was superior to usual GP care.

Click here to access the full text paper.

Online mental health services

NHS Choices, April 2015

NHS Choices have produced an overview of online mental health services for depression, anxiety and other conditions which have been approved by NICE.  Research shows that these online services can be just as effective as having face-to-face therapy with a therapist.

You may be able to use these online services for free on the NHS. Ask your GP or contact the services themselves directly to find out.  You can also pay for online mental health support privately if it’s not available on the NHS in your area.

Click here for further information.