Young Mums Together: An evaluation of a peer support project to improve the wellbeing of young mothers and their families

Mental Health Foundation, March 2018

Report from the Mental Health Foundation on the feasibility and acceptability of peer support measured in terms of parental confidence, resilience, mental health and future prospects.  A key factor in the success of the project was the role of the facilitator and their ability to manage the interpersonal dynamics and consistent attendance and resource availability.

Click here to view this report.

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Each and Every Need: A review of the quality of care provided to patients aged 0-25 years old with chronic neurodisability, using the cerebral palsies as examples of chronic neurodisabling conditions

Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership, March 2018

Review of the quality of care provided to patients aged 0-25 years old with chronic neurodisability, using the cerebral palsies as examples of chronic neurodisabling conditions.  The report aims to improve the care provided to children and young people in this area.

Click here to view the report in full.

Healthy Child Programme: rapid review on safeguarding

Public Health England, February 2018

The purpose of this rapid review is to update the evidence regarding safeguarding guidance, focusing on prevention and early intervention.

The review looks at relevant systematic review level evidence, supplemented with some primary impact evaluations in the areas of preventing or intervening early with:

  • child abuse and neglect
  • child sexual abuse and exploitation
  • intimate partner violence
  • female genital mutilation
  • gang violence

Click here to access the documents.

Don’t be left in the dark: children and young people’s mental health

Local Government Association, February 2018

This short guide provides an overview of the challenges facing mental health and wellbeing services for children and young people. It suggests least one in 10 children and young people are affected by mental health problems, and the unreported figures are likely to be even higher. Young people are increasingly struggling with problems like anxiety, depression and self-harm, with nearly 19,000 young people admitted to hospital after harming themselves in 2015 – a 14% rise over three years. It also considers current understanding how the increasing prevalence of social media in young people’s lives is negatively impacting their emotional health.

Click here to view the report.

Rapid review on safeguarding to inform the Healthy Child Programme 5 to 19

Public Health England, February 2018

The purpose of this rapid review is to update the evidence regarding safeguarding guidance, focusing on prevention and early intervention.  The review looks at relevant systematic review level evidence, supplemented with some primary impact evaluations in the areas of preventing or intervening early with:

  • child abuse and neglect
  • child sexual abuse and exploitation
  • intimate partner violence
  • female genital mutilation
  • gang violence

Click here to view the review.

Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry – February 2018

The February edition of Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry has been published.  This issue includes articles on the Incredible Years parenting programme, physiological hyperarousal as a risk factor for child social anxiety and a study showing language and reading comprehension in middle childhood predicts emotional and behaviour difficulties in adolescence for those with permanent childhood hearing loss.

Click here to view the table of contents.

Click here to request and article from the Library.

Transition from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services to Adult Mental Health Services

Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch, January 2018

This bulletin relates to an investigation into the transition from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services to Adult Mental Health Services. A combined community and mental health Trust reported the case of an 18-year-old man who died by suicide shortly after transitioning from the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) to the Adult Mental Health Service (AMHS). Identifies that some young adults may not be ready to transition to AMHS at 18 and benefit from additional short term support which may negate the need for AMHS. For those requiring longer term involvement with mental health services, the experience of AMHS can be very different from CAMHS leaving patients vulnerable to a deterioration in their mental health or withdrawing from the services available to them.

Click here to view the bulletin.