Care and communication between health professionals and patients affected by severe or chronic illness in community care settings: a qualitative study of care at the end of life

National Institute for Health Research, August 2015

Advance care planning (ACP) enables patients to consider, discuss and, if they wish, document their wishes and preferences for future care, including decisions to refuse treatment, in the event that they lose capacity to make decisions for themselves. This study aimed to investigate how patients, their relatives and health professionals initiate and experience discussion of ACP and the outcomes of advance discussions in shaping care at the end of life.

Click here to download the full text.


Sustainability, innovation and empowerment: a five year vision for the independent social care sector

Care England, June 2015

Care England, the largest representative body for independent social care providers, has published a report on the state of social care warning of a collapse in the system if providers and commissioners do not work together and more nurses are not recruited into the independent sector. It states that the next five years will be crucial in ensuring that the care and support services that many people rely on remain sustainable.

Click here to view the full report.

Tips for social workers on implementing the Care Act for deafblind people

Community Care, 8 January 2015

The most important date in social care this year will be the 1st April. This is when the Care Act comes in to force and it’s vital that local authorities and practitioners are ready for the changes this will bring.

For deafblind people, including the large numbers of older people with sight and hearing loss, the Act will bring welcome changes that will improve their experience of social care. Making sure the Act is implemented correctly however, is key to its success…

Click here to read the full story.

Key to Care: Report of the Burstow Commission on the Future of the Home Care Workforce

Local Government Information Unit, 2 December 2014

The Burstow Commission was formed to look into the state of home care, the level of workforce currently in place and what needs to change in order to ensure that home care is safe and efficient in the future.  This report outlines clear recommendations on what needs to change to have a professional, well-paid, well-trained and properly regulated workforce who can provide the quality of care at home that people need. But it also recognises the complex nature of social care and the interrelatedness of problems and solutions. It features the stories of care workers, in their own words, who powerfully speak on both what needs to change and what could be the future of care.

Click here for further information and to download the report.

How can ‘positive risk-taking’ help build dementia-friendly communities?

Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 11 November 2014

Managing risk can dominate everyday practice in dementia care. However, based on learning from approaches developed in statutory mental health services, the benefits of ‘positive risk-taking’ can outweigh the negative effect of avoiding risk altogether. This Viewpoint report explores the ways in which:

  • The focus of positive risk-taking is on making good decisions; it is the taking of calculated and reasoned risks, not leaving things to chance.
  • It is all too easy to see the negatives around someone living with dementia and to remain oblivious to their capabilities and potential.
  • A dementia-friendly neighbourhood or community is good for everyone, from individuals to businesses; it is not just about accommodating people living with dementia

Click here to download the report.

Independent report demands action on care of people with learning disabilities

NHS England, 26 November 2014

NHS England has published an independent report into the future care of people with learning disabilities.

Sir Stephen Bubb, chief executive of charity leaders body ACEVO, was asked by NHS England to work with stakeholders and make recommendations for the development of a national commissioning framework to address the serious shortcomings in the provision of support for people with learning disabilities.

Sir Stephen’s report makes a series of recommendations for the NHS, local government, regulators and the government, that include a robust NHS commissioning framework to support people with learning disabilities and autism move out of hospitals and into the community.

Click here for further information and to download the report.