2017 drug strategy

Home Office, July 2017

The drug strategy 2017 sets out how the government and its partners, at local, national and international levels, will take new action to tackle drug misuse and the harms it causes.

Click here to access the Drug Strategy and associated documents.

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Drug safety testing at festivals and night clubs

Royal Society for Public Health, June 2017

This policy paper looks at how health harm related to drug use, particularly from stimulant ‘club drugs’ such as ecstasy, can be minimised in night clubs and music festivals.  Drug safety testing pilots at two UK festivals in 2016 saw almost one in five users (18%) dispose of their drugs once aware of the content.  The paper calls for the roll out of drug safety testing facilities as standard in the UK across all festivals, city centre nightlife areas in the UK and as a client service at drug treatment services.

Click here to view the report.

European Drug Report 2017: Trends and Developments

European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, June 2017

This Trends and Developments report presents a top-level overview of the drug phenomenon in Europe, covering drug supply, use and public health problems as well as drug policy and responses. Together with the online Statistical Bulletin, Country Drug Reports and Perspectives on Drugs, it makes up the 2017 European Drug Report package.

Click here to view the report.

System launched to help tackle harms from new psychoactive substances

Public Health England, March 2017

Public Health England (PHE) in collaboration with the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) is piloting a national system to help better monitor the negative effects of new psychoactive substances and share best treatment practice across a variety of settings, including A&E, sexual health clinics, mental health services, prison health services, drug treatment services and GP surgeries.

The UK-wide, easy to use Report Illicit Drug Reaction (RIDR) system will be accessible to all front line health staff. Information about the drug and its effects will be recorded anonymously using an online portal. Data from the tool will be analysed by experts to identify patterns of symptoms and harms. This will be used to inform treatment guidance and help staff deal more quickly with unknown substances, and improve patient safety.

Click here to view the full story.