Mental Health at Work resource

MIND, September 2018

This website has been produced by MIND to help employers, employees and organisations find the resources and information they need to promote good mental health at work.

Click here to access the website.

Advertisements

Social reintegration and employment: evidence and interventions for drug users in treatment

European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, September 2018

In order to help drug users become full members of society following treatment, measures are needed that address the issues of housing, education, vocational training and employment as part of their recovery. This report considers existing interventions targeting this vulnerable social group. It also provides a set of conclusions targeted at policymakers and drug practitioners, in order to help them develop coherent and comprehensive social integration strategies. Examples of ‘what works’ in practice are a vital first step in developing evidence-based guidelines for future interventions.

Click here to view the full report.

Promising practices for health and wellbeing at work: A review of the evidence landscape: (RAND RR2409)

RAND Corporation, August 2018

Research demonstrates that the support of wellbeing in the workplace has a positive impact on staff, business and organisations. It includes benefits in terms of reduced absenteeism and presenteeism as well as improved productivity. Whilst the landscape of health and wellbeing interventions is a broad one, it can be difficult to understand ‘what works’: or rather, the confidence which can be placed in a particular intervention that it will have a positive impact on staff health and wellbeing outcomes.

Click here to view this report.

Global strategy on human resources for health: Workforce 2030

World Health Organization, July 2018

The Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health: Workforce 2030 is primarily aimed at planners and policy-makers of WHO Member States, but its contents are of value to all relevant stakeholders in the health workforce area, including public and private sector employers, professional associations, education and training institutions, labour unions, bilateral and multilateral development partners, international organizations, and civil society.

Click here to view the full report.

Start Well: Stay Well – a model to support new starters: Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

NHS Employers, June 2018

The Start Well: Stay Well model formalises the approach to meeting, greeting and supporting all new starters. It engages with new starters at various touch points, including on appointment and before they arrive at CUH as part of the on-boarding process. A key feature of the model was employee buddies; the ambition was that all new starters, clinical and non-clinical, would be assigned a buddy on their first day. The theatres teams embraced this approach and installed photo posters in their areas to ensure named buddies were visible to all.  Integral to the model is a hi-5 moment approach, which comprises of a high impact, high energy, high importance contact with staff which can be delivered in five minutes. This is built around five open questions:

  • How are you today?
  • How is your induction going?
  • How are you settling in?
  • How can the team help?
  • How can I help?

Click here to view the full report.

From prison to work: A new frontier for Individual Placement and Support

Centre for Mental Health, June 2018

From prison to work: A new frontier for Individual Placement and Support reports on a pilot programme in the West Midlands to support prisoners with mental health difficulties into employment when they are released. The programme sought to employ the proven Individual Placement and Support approach from mental health services to the criminal justice system for the first time. It enabled people who would otherwise have had little prospect of paid work to get jobs when they were released from prison as well as providing help with basic needs such as housing and health.

The report finds that the Individual Placement and Support approach can be adapted successfully to support prisoners to get work when they are released. It calls on the Government to invest in a larger scale trial of IPS for former prisoners and to reform existing employment services in the criminal justice system. The report also found that few of the people who had been in contact with prison mental health services as a result of complex needs and vulnerabilities were supported by community mental health services after their release. And many former prisoners got scant help with housing or money despite leaving prison with nowhere to live and no income. It calls on the NHS and probation services to offer more effective, holistic support to former prisoners to support their rehabilitation.

Click here to view the full report.

Global Future: Our International Health Service

Our Global Future, June 2018

Report that looks at future staffing in the NHS following the Brexit referendum. It identifies that the NHS is finding it increasingly difficult to attract the clinical staff it needs from the EU. The number of EU nurses is already falling, and the proportion of European doctors gaining a licence in the UK has fallen from 25% of the total in 2014 to just 16% in 2017. This is making the NHS increasingly dependent on staff from outside the EU, who are being refused entry into the UK in their hundreds. Without relaxations in those restrictions and a commitment to erecting no new barriers to potential NHS staff from the EU after Brexit, the NHS will be unable to recruit the staff it needs. Key findings are:

  • The number of European nurses in the NHS has fallen since the EU referendum.
  • The proportion of EU/EEA doctors gaining a licence to practice in the UK has fallen from 25% of the total in 2014 to just 16% in 2017.
  • The rate of increase in the number of EU/EEA doctors in the NHS has decreased every year for the last five years.
  • The rate of increase in the number of EU/EEA doctors registered by the GMC in England has decreased every year for the last five years.

Click here to view the full report.