Global Future: Our International Health Service

Our Global Future, June 2018

Report that looks at future staffing in the NHS following the Brexit referendum. It identifies that the NHS is finding it increasingly difficult to attract the clinical staff it needs from the EU. The number of EU nurses is already falling, and the proportion of European doctors gaining a licence in the UK has fallen from 25% of the total in 2014 to just 16% in 2017. This is making the NHS increasingly dependent on staff from outside the EU, who are being refused entry into the UK in their hundreds. Without relaxations in those restrictions and a commitment to erecting no new barriers to potential NHS staff from the EU after Brexit, the NHS will be unable to recruit the staff it needs. Key findings are:

  • The number of European nurses in the NHS has fallen since the EU referendum.
  • The proportion of EU/EEA doctors gaining a licence to practice in the UK has fallen from 25% of the total in 2014 to just 16% in 2017.
  • The rate of increase in the number of EU/EEA doctors in the NHS has decreased every year for the last five years.
  • The rate of increase in the number of EU/EEA doctors registered by the GMC in England has decreased every year for the last five years.

Click here to view the full report.

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NHS reality check: Update 2018

Royal College of Physicians, March 2018

Report on a repeat of last years NHS reality check survey which finds doctors struggling against rising demand, the impact of an ageing population with increasingly complex medical needs, and the difficulties of maintaining morale when the NHS is underfunded, under-doctored and overstretched.

Click here to view the full report.

National Minimum Wage: sleep-in care: (Bulletin Number CBP 8243)

House of Commons Library, March 2018

In April 2017 the Employment Appeal Tribunal handed down judgment in Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake, providing further guidance on whether employees who undertake sleep-in duties are entitled the National Minimum Wage (NMW) for the time during which they are sleeping. The Tribunal held that, in some cases, carers who are required to be present throughout the night will be entitled to the NMW whether awake or asleep. While this proposition had been established by case law prior to the Mencap case, government guidance had not explained this clearly.

Social care providers have expressed concerns about their ability to meet the requirement to pay carers the NMW during sleep-in shifts. Moreover, many such providers may be exposed to claims for backdated pay.  To obtain backdated wages if underpaid, an employee could take a claim to the employment tribunal or the country court. In addition, the State enforces the NMW. If an employer has breached NMW law, HMRC may take enforcement action.

Following the Mencap decision and the realisation that government guidance had been “potentially misleading”, the Government has set up the Social Care Compliance Scheme and temporarily modified its policy on enforcing the NMW in the social care sector.

Click here to view the full report.

Developing People Improving Care Together: one year on

NHS England, January 2018

One year on from the launch of the Developing People- Improving Care, this report highlights how leaders across health and social care have implemented the framework.  This involves ensuring systems of compassion, inclusion and improvement, are at the core of the health and care system. The report also sets out plans for the year ahead and some of the steps you can take to learn more about the framework.

Click here to view the report.

Skills for the North: Devolving technical education to cities

Institute for Public Policy Research, January 2018

Qualifications levels across the north of England are lower than for England as a whole. The Employer Skills Survey suggests that that trends in skills shortages and gaps in the north of England are distributed differently across occupations from national ones, and also that there are some striking contrasts between parts of the North. This IPPR report suggests devolving some powers and budgets for skills would help to align provision with regional economic and social priorities, and to create more agile and efficient systems.

Click here to view the report.

Retaining your clinical staff: a practical improvement resource

NHS Improvement, December 2017

This improvement resource outlines key steps to improving retention of clinical staff. It has distilled our advice from interviews with trust HR directors, directors of nursing and medical directors.  It recognises that no one action will boost retention on its own – sustained action in several areas is needed. It also acknowledges that external factors like private sector wage growth, the strength of the pound and the increasing demands of a clinical role in the NHS all make it difficult to retain staff.  Despite this there are factors in trusts’ control and trusts are exploiting these in their efforts to improve retention. These factors are covered in this resource.

Click here to view the resource.

Good work, wellbeing and changes in performance outcomes: illustrating the effects of good people management practices with an analysis of the National Health Service

What Works Wellbeing, December 2017

This report illustrates the effect of good people management with an analysis of the National Health Service.  The report found Trusts that made the most extensive use of good people management practices were over three times more likely to have the lowest levels of staff sickness absence and at least four times more likely to have the most satisfied patients. They were also more than twice as likely to have staff with the highest levels of job satisfaction compared to NHS Trusts that made least use of these practices, and over three times more likely to have staff with the highest levels of engagement. No link was found between people management practices and patient mortality.

Click here to view the full report.