Retaining your clinical staff: a practical improvement resource

NHS Improvement, December 2017

This improvement resource outlines key steps to improving retention of clinical staff. It has distilled our advice from interviews with trust HR directors, directors of nursing and medical directors.  It recognises that no one action will boost retention on its own – sustained action in several areas is needed. It also acknowledges that external factors like private sector wage growth, the strength of the pound and the increasing demands of a clinical role in the NHS all make it difficult to retain staff.  Despite this there are factors in trusts’ control and trusts are exploiting these in their efforts to improve retention. These factors are covered in this resource.

Click here to view the resource.

Advertisements

Good work, wellbeing and changes in performance outcomes: illustrating the effects of good people management practices with an analysis of the National Health Service

What Works Wellbeing, December 2017

This report illustrates the effect of good people management with an analysis of the National Health Service.  The report found Trusts that made the most extensive use of good people management practices were over three times more likely to have the lowest levels of staff sickness absence and at least four times more likely to have the most satisfied patients. They were also more than twice as likely to have staff with the highest levels of job satisfaction compared to NHS Trusts that made least use of these practices, and over three times more likely to have staff with the highest levels of engagement. No link was found between people management practices and patient mortality.

Click here to view the full report.

The future of the mental health workforce

Centre for Mental Health, November 2017

This report presents the key findings from a review of:

  • The current workforce in specialist, NHS funded mental health services in England;
  • Current policy and its impact on the future workforce;
  • The views of people who work in and use mental health services, obtained through a series of consultation events and roundtable meetings held across the country in early 2017

Click here to read the full report.

Royal College of Psychiatrists workforce census

Royal College of Psychiatrists, November 2017

The latest Royal College of Psychiatrists workforce census of psychiatric staffing was run between April and September 2017 and provides a detailed analysis of the consultant and specialty doctor workforce in psychiatry across England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales. The report find that:

  • Levels of growth in filled consultant posts are largely static.
  • There is an ongoing rise in the reported number of vacant or unfilled consultant posts across the UK, up from 5% (2013), 7% (2015) to 9% (2017).
  • Vacancies in consultant posts are most acute in General, CAMHS, Old Age and Intellectual (Learning) Disability psychiatry.
  • There has been a sharp increase in the use of locum specialty doctors, a reflection of the ongoing recruitment difficulties at that grade.
  • A wide variation in the gender balance across different psychiatric specialities.

Click here to view the full report.

Click here to view the summary report.

Thriving at Work: a review of mental health and employers

Department of Work and Pensions, October 2017

Thriving at Work sets out what employers can do to better support all employees, including those with mental health problems to remain in and thrive through work.

It includes a detailed analysis that explores the significant cost of poor mental health to UK businesses and the economy as a whole. Poor mental health costs employers between £33 billion and £42 billion a year, with an annual cost to the UK economy of between £74 billion and £99 billion.

The review quantifies how investing in supporting mental health at work is good for business and productivity. The most important recommendation is that all employers, regardless of size or industry, should adopt 6 ‘mental health core standards’ that lay basic foundations for an approach to workplace mental health. It also details how large employers and the public sector can develop these standards further through a set of ‘mental health enhanced standards’. The review also makes a series of recommendations to government and other bodies.

Click here to read the full report.

Your future nurses infographic

NHS Employers, October 2017
Until recently, the routes to developing registered nurses within the workforce have been limited, with the university degree being the main way to train this group of staff.  The introduction of the nursing degree apprenticeship gives a new opportunity for employers to train nurses, while the creation of the new nursing associate role can help to be a bridge between healthcare assistants and graduate registered nurses. This infographic provides a resource to support employers to make the most of the new and existing routes into nursing.

Click here to view the infographic.