Adult Social Care Funding (England)

House of Commons Library, February 2017

This paper examines the key funding pressures facing adult social care services in England and evidence of the impacts of these pressures on social care and health services. The paper explains the additional funding for adult social care that the Government has made available through the Social Care Precept, improved Better Care Fund and Adult Social Care Support Grant. The paper also discusses stakeholder concerns about a growing social care ‘funding gap’, and calls for a comprehensive review of the long-term sustainability of social care.

Click here to view the briefing.


Health and Care of Older People in England 2017

Age UK, February 2017

This report draws on new statistics as well as new Age UK analysis highlighting the immense challenges facing older people needing support, with 1 in 8 over 65s now living with unmet care needs.

The report demonstrates the immense challenges facing older people who need care, the numbers of whom increase every day, and the impact of the failure to provide it on their health and wellbeing, as well as the NHS.

Click here to view the full report.

Pioneering venture launched to help solve ‘capital finance conundrum’

NHS Confederation, February 2017

A pioneering new initiative is set to radically transform NHS organisations’ ability to tap into local economic opportunities.

The Local Growth Academy, an exciting cross-sectoral venture, has been launched to help NHS organisations understand how to access the new and emerging finance mechanisms determining local infrastructure planning…

Click here to read the full story.

Developing an outcomes-based payment approach for Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services: detailed guidance

NHS Confederation, January 2017

NHS Improvement and NHS England have published detailed guidance on the new outcomes based payment approach for IAPT services. This follows NHS Improvement’s publication of the 2017/19 National Tariff Payment System (2017/19 NTPS). Within this, rule 8 mandates the use of an outcomes-based payment model for IAPT services from 1 April 2018. The IAPT outcomes-based payment approach intends to balance the need to pay for activity, taking into account case complexity and severity as a driver of cost, with the need to incentivise good outcomes.

Click here to view the guidance.

Implications of reductions to public spending for LGB and T people and services

NatCen, November 2016

This study gives insights into whether, and in what ways, reductions in public spending have affected services for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGB & T) people. NatCen conducted the same research in 2013 looking at the early effects of the cuts, which began in 2010. The key finding of this study was that fears about the effects of public funding cuts reported in 2013 were seen as a reality for some LGB & T service users and service providers by 2016.

Click here to view this report.

Commitments to increase mental health funding not reaching the front line

King’s Fund, October 2016

Analysis by the King’s Fund shows that 40 per cent of mental health trusts saw their income fall in 2015/16. This is despite the government’s commitment to parity of esteem for mental health and assurances from NHS England that almost 90 per cent of plans submitted by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) last year included mental health funding increases.  The findings are based on analysis of the annual accounts of all 58 mental health trusts in England. Given that mental health trusts provide about 80 per cent of all mental health care, the fact that income fell in so many trusts last year provides a clear indication that the promised funding increases are not reaching the front line.

Click here for further information on this analysis.

Mental health crisis care: health based places of safety funding

Department of Health, May 2016

This guidance document sets out how local crisis care concordat groups can apply for funding to increase the capacity and number of health based places of safety.

If someone is having a mental health crisis and they come to the attention of the police, they may need to be taken to a place of safety – somewhere that is designated as safe under the Mental Health Act.

The best place of safety is in a health setting, so that people, including children and young people, get the care they need for their mental health.

This funding programme aims to increase and improve health based places of safety and continue to reduce police cells being used as an alternative. Bids for a share of the £15 million fund will be managed by the Department of Health.

This is part of the mental health crisis care agreement (Crisis Care Concordat) to support people in a mental health crisis.

Click here for further information and to view the document