Digital change in health and social care

The King’s Fund, June 2018

Report from the King’s Fund on the use of digital technology in health and social care can improve quality, efficiency and patient experience as well as supporting more integrated care and improving the health of a population. This report shares practical learning from a series of case studies where large-scale digital change is happening.

Click here to view the full report.

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Taking The Value-Based Agenda Forward: The Five Essential Components Of Value-Based Approaches To Health And Care

NHS Confederation, June 2018

NHS Confederation report that explores how the adoption of value-based healthcare could be spread across all parts of the healthcare system, maximising the benefits for those who use NHS and wider services. It also explores the central challenge of how value-based healthcare is taken to the next stage and embedded across the whole system. Five key characteristics are identified:

  • Learning and adapting through innovation
  • Managing risk
  • Making best use of data
  • Thinking about pathways across the whole system
  • Listening to patients

Click here to view the full report.

Better health and care for all: A 10-point plan for the 2020s: The final report of the Lord Darzi Review of Health and Care

Institute for Public Policy Research, June 2018

This final report of the Lord Darzi Review puts forward a 10-point plan to achieve this, as well as a 10-point offer to the public which sets out what the health and care system will be able to offer if this plan for investment and reform is adopted.

  1. Invest in health, not just healthcare.
  2. ‘Tilt towards tech’ to create a digital first health and care system.
  3. Unlock the potential of health as a driver of wealth.
  4. Make social care free at the point of need.
  5. Establish a ‘New Deal’ for general practice, mental health and community services.
  6. A radical simplification of the system.
  7. Revitalise quality as the organising principle of health and care.
  8. Invest in the talent of the team.
  9. Provide time and resource to transform health and care.
  10. Set out a long term funding settlement for health and care.

Click here to view the full report.

Behind the Headlines: the battle to get care at home

Age UK, June 2018

Age UK report that finds families it seems, getting access to decent quality, reliable home care, and maintaining it, is a real battle. Key issues are:

  • Long waits to get an assessment
  • Services that are disjointed or simply unresponsive
  • Social services refusing to get involved
  • Fundamental lack of capacity in the system
  • Poor quality services and support
  • Support and services being cut back
  • Help for families providing care being withdrawn

Click here to view the full report.

Making the money work in the health and care system

HfMA and PWC, June 2018

Joint report from the HfMA and PWC identifying how financial flows could be redesigned to find a better way to make money work in the health and care system. The report sets out why the current complex system of funding flows do not support the proposed new models of more integrated care introduced in the Five-year forward view and therefore need to change. It proposes:

  • Financial flows should be aligned with the emerging place based architecture
  • Systems should be provided with more clarity through longer-term funding
  • Money should be focused towards achieving better outcomes.

Click here to view the full report.

Health, Ageing and Support: survey of views of people aged 50 and over: A study for the Department of Health

Department of Health and Social Care, May 2018

This report provides the results from an Ipsos MORI survey of the views of people aged 50 or over on health, ageing and support. The survey was conducted on behalf of the Department of Health and Social Care, and fieldwork took place between 4 January and 21 February 2016.  Key findings are:

  • People aged 50 and over take their physical and mental health seriously; they name numerous actions they take to maintain their health. Eating healthily is seen as important for both physical and mental health.
  • However, nearly half do not think a healthy lifestyle can prevent dementia.
  • Loneliness is seen as a big problem for older people and people aged 50 and over think society is not doing enough to prevent it.
  • Attitudes to care and support services are mixed but generally less positive than we see for the NHS. There are still large numbers unable to give an opinion either way (as seen in the 2015 Public Perceptions of the NHS and Social Care Tracker Survey).
  • There are doubts over whether hospitals provide the same standard of emergency care seven days a week.
  • There is a long way to go in terms of uptake of new digital channels, but this age group (who are higher service users) are more likely than the general public to have used them.
  • There is a lot more to do to ensure people prepare for future care costs and have the support they need to care for those close to them.

Click here to view the full report.