Behind the Headlines: the battle to get care at home

Age UK, June 2018

Age UK report that finds families it seems, getting access to decent quality, reliable home care, and maintaining it, is a real battle. Key issues are:

  • Long waits to get an assessment
  • Services that are disjointed or simply unresponsive
  • Social services refusing to get involved
  • Fundamental lack of capacity in the system
  • Poor quality services and support
  • Support and services being cut back
  • Help for families providing care being withdrawn

Click here to view the full report.

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Making the money work in the health and care system

HfMA and PWC, June 2018

Joint report from the HfMA and PWC identifying how financial flows could be redesigned to find a better way to make money work in the health and care system. The report sets out why the current complex system of funding flows do not support the proposed new models of more integrated care introduced in the Five-year forward view and therefore need to change. It proposes:

  • Financial flows should be aligned with the emerging place based architecture
  • Systems should be provided with more clarity through longer-term funding
  • Money should be focused towards achieving better outcomes.

Click here to view the full report.

Health, Ageing and Support: survey of views of people aged 50 and over: A study for the Department of Health

Department of Health and Social Care, May 2018

This report provides the results from an Ipsos MORI survey of the views of people aged 50 or over on health, ageing and support. The survey was conducted on behalf of the Department of Health and Social Care, and fieldwork took place between 4 January and 21 February 2016.  Key findings are:

  • People aged 50 and over take their physical and mental health seriously; they name numerous actions they take to maintain their health. Eating healthily is seen as important for both physical and mental health.
  • However, nearly half do not think a healthy lifestyle can prevent dementia.
  • Loneliness is seen as a big problem for older people and people aged 50 and over think society is not doing enough to prevent it.
  • Attitudes to care and support services are mixed but generally less positive than we see for the NHS. There are still large numbers unable to give an opinion either way (as seen in the 2015 Public Perceptions of the NHS and Social Care Tracker Survey).
  • There are doubts over whether hospitals provide the same standard of emergency care seven days a week.
  • There is a long way to go in terms of uptake of new digital channels, but this age group (who are higher service users) are more likely than the general public to have used them.
  • There is a lot more to do to ensure people prepare for future care costs and have the support they need to care for those close to them.

Click here to view the full report.

Growing innovative models of health, care and support for adults: Future of care Number 6

Social Care Institute for Excellence, January 2018

Briefing that identifies that innovation is needed more than ever as challenges grow. Innovation does not only mean technological breakthroughs or large restructures. New and better ways of delivering
relationship-based care are needed, and already exist, but are inconsistently implemented or poorly scaled.  It identifies the following requirements for innovation to flourish:

  • a shared ambition to ‘embed person- and community-centred ways of working across the system, using the best available tools and evidence’
  • co-production: planning with the people who have the greatest stake in our services from the beginning
  • a new model of leadership which is collaborative and convening
  • investment and commissioning approaches which transfer resources from low quality, low outcomes into approaches which work effectively
  • effective outcomes monitoring and use of data to drive change
  • a willingness to learn from experience.

Click here to view the full report.

The 2,000 days project: Practical ideas for reforming health and care

Healthcare at Home, November 2017

An Industry Coalition Group of clinicians, senior leaders in hospitals, primary care, the central bodies, charities and the private sector met earlier this year to take on the challenge of re-energising the NHS approach to handling rising demand, hospital debt, slow technological innovation and growing public expectations.  This report from Healthcare at Home identifies many examples of new care provision,  but also that current reform struggles to deliver the change needed, and integrated care is not happening on the scale required.  This report identifies seven key principles for reform:

  • Person-centred care must be at the heart of every NHS decision and action.
  • Person-centred care means taking every opportunity to maximise our ability to manage our own health. The NHS needs to focus on what we can do, not just try to fix what we can’t.
  • NHS leaders need to see joy and fulfilment in the workplace as key to delivering person-centred care and nurturing innovation.
  • Care services must stop being health and safety police, and take a more balanced approach to risk, to empower staff and let people live the lives they want.
  • Clinicians and managers need to be taught how to think digitally so they develop their own solutions using consumer technology. Online and face-to-face services should be integrated.
  • Where possible there should be direct access, including digital access, to community services.
  • The costs, benefits and practicalities of developing care at home need to be understood and debated.

Click here to view the full report.