First 1000 days of life

Health and Social Care Committee, February 2019

This report calls on the Government to produce a long-term, cross-Government strategy for the first 1000 days of life, setting goals to reduce adverse childhood experiences, improve school readiness and reduce infant mortality and child poverty.  The report also calls for the Government’s Healthy Child Programme to be revised, improved and given greater impetus. The Committee recommends that the programme should be expanded to focus on the health of the whole family, begin before conception, deliver a greater continuity of care for children, parents and families during this period and extend visits beyond age 2½ years.

Click here to view the full report.

Overview of the 6 early years and school aged years high impact areas: Health visitors and school nurses leading the Healthy Child Programme

Department of Health and Social Care and Public Health England, December 2018

The purpose of this report is to illustrate the contribution of health visitors to the Healthy Child Programme (0-5) and school nurses to the Healthy Child Programme (5-19) and to describe areas where health visitors and school nurses have a significant impact on health and wellbeing and improving outcomes for children, young people, families and communities.

Click here to view the full report.

A Crying Shame: A report by the Office of the Children’s Commissioner into vulnerable babies in England

Office of the Children’s Commissioner, October 2018

This report looks at how many babies might be vulnerable in this way and presents the facts about the sort of risks even very young children are being exposed to. Much of the data is missing; however, we are publishing the best estimates we can give of the numbers of babies living in high-risk households. A more detailed technical report explains some of the factors which affect the calculations2 – namely, that very little data is collected or collated about vulnerable babies, and that the data which does exist is often reported for children in age brackets (0-4) and not broken down for babies under a year old.

Click here to view the full report.

Feeding in the First Year of Life

Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition, July 2018

Report from the Scientific Advisory Committee on Nutrition (SACN)  thatconsiders evidence on the impact of infant feeding on short and longer term health outcomes for infants and mothers. It also considers factors that influence eating behaviour and diversification of the diet and makes recommendations on feeding in the first year of life. SACN’s conclusions are largely consistent with existing advice on infant feeding, the introduction of solid foods and diversification of the infant diet.

  1. Breastfeeding makes an important contribution to infant and maternal health. SACN recommends retaining existing advice for women to exclusively breastfeed for around the first 6 months and to continue breastfeeding for at least the first year of life once solid foods have been introduced. SACN recommends that infants are not introduced to solid foods until around 6 months of age.
  2. Recommends that a wide variety of solids foods, including iron-containing foods should be introduced in an age appropriate form from around 6 months of age. The types of food, flavours and textures offered should become increasingly diverse throughout the complementary feeding period. SACN noted that new foods may need to be presented to infants on many occasions before they are accepted, particularly as infants get older.
  3. Recommends that advice on complementary feeding should state that foods containing peanut and hen’s egg can be introduced from around 6 months of age and need not be differentiated from other solid foods. The deliberate exclusion of peanut or hen’s egg beyond 6 to 12 months of age may increase the risk of allergy to the same foods.

Click here to view this report.

 

Community Practitioner – November 2017

The November edition of Community Practitioner has been published.  This issue includes articles on flu hospitalization risk for children with older siblings, childhood infection linked to coeliac disease, and rates of breastfeeding in the UK.

Click here to view the table of contents.  You will need to login with your LCFT OpenAthens account to view the full text articles.