The spread challenge: How to support the successful uptake of innovations and improvements in health care

The Health Foundation, September 2018

Health Foundation report considering:

  • The challenges facing the NHS in improving the uptake of new ideas and practices, and the need for new approaches when developing national and local programmes to support the spread of innovation.
  • It highlights why health care improvement programmes need to be designed in more sophisticated ways if ambitions to improve health care services are to be realised.
  • Health care improvement is not only about finding innovative solutions to the challenges facing the health service, but also how to ensure these solutions are taken up successfully across the NHS. Challenging traditional ways of thinking, the report argues that programmes to spread innovation and improvement should support those adopting an idea developed elsewhere, as well as innovators.

Click here to view the full report.

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Accelerating Artificial Intelligence in health and care: results from a state of the nation survey

The AHSN Network, September 2018

A new ‘state of the nation report about the use of Artificial Intelligence in health and care has found that we are only beginning to unlock the potential of AI.  The report spotlights some of the opportunities AI creates and shows where it is already being used in projects across the country. It also considers some of the barriers to wider deployment of AI and proposes solutions, including the creation of a “code of conduct” for the sector.

Click here to view the full report.

Initial code of conduct for data-driven health and care technology

Department of Health and Social Care, September 2018

This code provides clarification of:

  • what is expected from suppliers of data-driven technologies
  • what the government will do to support and encourage innovators in health and care, including the development of trusted approval systems and a coherent pathway for suppliers to enter the market

The code provides the basis for ongoing engagement and conversation on how we should use new technology to provide better and more sustainable services, with:

  • our partners in academia, industry and the health and care system
  • patients
  • clinicians
  • the wider public

The code provides the basis for the health and care system and suppliers of digital technology to enter into commercial terms in which the benefits of the partnerships between technology companies and health and care providers are shared fairly.

Click here to view the code.

NHS England Test Beds Programme: Information Governance learning from Wave 1

NHS England, September 2018

The Test Beds programme brings NHS organisations and innovators into partnerships to see how combinations of technology and pathway redesign can improve quality of life and experience for patients and carers.  This handbook is relevant for programme leaders, project managers and information governance staff working on similar projects and will enable them to:

  • Understand common information governance challenges, like those faced by Wave 1 Test Beds, and benefit from their learning
  • Plan information governance activity across a project’s lifespan
  • Access tools and guidance that can support their work

It also provides useful links and resources supports the detailed learning captured in NHS England Test Beds Programme: Information Governance learning from Wave 1.

Click here to view the handbook.

Seven principles for public engagement in science and innovation policymaking: A guide from Nesta’s Inclusive Innovation team –

Nesta, September 2018

Why should researchers, innovators and those whose jobs it is to regulate technology engage with people who aren’t like them on topics like research and innovation?

  • To give those in power a broader range of potential futures to aspire to
  • To encourage researchers and policymakers to think about broader social, political and ethical issues
  • To improve research and innovation
  • To make sure the benefits of research and innovation are shared widely

The report proposes the following 7 key principles:

  1. Supported by those with the power to change things
  2. Open to experimentation
  3. Designed with a clear goal in mind
  4. Sensible about measures of success
  5. Targeted at specific audiences and communities not the general public
  6. Beneficial for participants
  7. Informed and facilitated

Click here to view the report.

Issues Surrounding the Estimation of the Opportunity Cost of Adopting a New Health Care Technology: Areas for Further Research

Office for Health Economics, August 2018

Proposes new approaches in three areas to improve understanding of supply side opportunity costs for the NHS. It explores improving efficiency, production functions and purchaser priorities.

Click here to view this report.

What will new technology mean for the NHS and its patients?: Four big technological trends

The Nuffield Trust, June 2018

Report that considers the potential impact of the following technologies to improve health care.:

  • Genomics and precision medicine can target treatment interventions at specific sub-groups of patients, potentially making them more effective and opening up new therapeutic possibilities.
  • Remote care can improve access to health care services, enabling patient needs to be addressed as early as possible and potentially making systems more efficient.
  • Technology-supported self-management can help to empower patients to better manage and understand their condition, supporting improved behavioural and clinical outcomes.
  • Data can provide new ways for the NHS to learn, improve and generate new research – alongside artificial intelligence (AI), which is providing new analytical capacity for diagnosing patients, effective triage and logistics.

Click here to view this report.