Innovation Agency launches coaching academy for health professionals

Digitalhealth.net

A coaching academy has been launched in England to help health and social care professionals introduce new innovations and improvements to the workplace.

The Innovation Agency’s academy is open to people working in the NHS, universities, voluntary and other public sector organisations within the areas of Cheshire, Lancashire, Merseyside and South Cumbria.

Click here to read the full story.

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Growing innovative models of health, care and support for adults: Future of care Number 6

Social Care Institute for Excellence, January 2018

Briefing that identifies that innovation is needed more than ever as challenges grow. Innovation does not only mean technological breakthroughs or large restructures. New and better ways of delivering
relationship-based care are needed, and already exist, but are inconsistently implemented or poorly scaled.  It identifies the following requirements for innovation to flourish:

  • a shared ambition to ‘embed person- and community-centred ways of working across the system, using the best available tools and evidence’
  • co-production: planning with the people who have the greatest stake in our services from the beginning
  • a new model of leadership which is collaborative and convening
  • investment and commissioning approaches which transfer resources from low quality, low outcomes into approaches which work effectively
  • effective outcomes monitoring and use of data to drive change
  • a willingness to learn from experience.

Click here to view the full report.

Falling short: Why the NHS is still struggling to make the most of new innovations

Nuffield Trust, December 2017

Nuffield Trust report on the slow adoption of innovations by the NHS that finds it is due to:

  • An overly supply-driven and top-down approach to innovation. Shifts towards the co-production of solutions between clinicians and industry are encouraging, but initiatives such as the Innovation and Technology Tariff (while useful in some regards) do little to move the NHS away from a supply-driven approach, which starts with products first.
  • Identifying the most pressing problems and looking for solutions is rarely built into anyone’s day job – least of all clinicians. This is further compounded by a lack of clarity around how far chief executives should be involved in adopting innovation. Chief innovation officers with board oversight of the innovation process could make a fundamental difference.
  • Evidence generation (and the bodies that support it such as NIHR) are often not conducive to assessing real-world innovations in a timely way – particularly where there is a focus on cost effectiveness (rather than cost benefit).
  • Too often procurement departments and organisations as a whole look to innovations to produce short-term cash-releasing savings, rather than identifying where innovations can transform care pathways and lead to more efficient services. This requires adaptive leadership that can work across boundaries.
  • There is a tension between the policy push towards large-scale organisations (such as accountable care systems) and the capacity of SMEs to fulfil the needs of large contracts.

Click here to view the full report.

The 2,000 days project: Practical ideas for reforming health and care

Healthcare at Home, November 2017

An Industry Coalition Group of clinicians, senior leaders in hospitals, primary care, the central bodies, charities and the private sector met earlier this year to take on the challenge of re-energising the NHS approach to handling rising demand, hospital debt, slow technological innovation and growing public expectations.  This report from Healthcare at Home identifies many examples of new care provision,  but also that current reform struggles to deliver the change needed, and integrated care is not happening on the scale required.  This report identifies seven key principles for reform:

  • Person-centred care must be at the heart of every NHS decision and action.
  • Person-centred care means taking every opportunity to maximise our ability to manage our own health. The NHS needs to focus on what we can do, not just try to fix what we can’t.
  • NHS leaders need to see joy and fulfilment in the workplace as key to delivering person-centred care and nurturing innovation.
  • Care services must stop being health and safety police, and take a more balanced approach to risk, to empower staff and let people live the lives they want.
  • Clinicians and managers need to be taught how to think digitally so they develop their own solutions using consumer technology. Online and face-to-face services should be integrated.
  • Where possible there should be direct access, including digital access, to community services.
  • The costs, benefits and practicalities of developing care at home need to be understood and debated.

Click here to view the full report.

£86 million central funding pot for healthcare technology

digitalhealth, July 2017

A £86 million fund for investment in innovative healthcare technology has been announced by the government – it will include the launch of a new Digital Health Catalyst.

Unveiled last week, the multi-million pound fund will support small and medium sized enterprises to develop, test and integrate new technologies in the NHS.

Click here to read the full story.

Enabling change through communities of practice: Wellbeing Our Way

National Voices, June 2017

In June 2014, National Voices set out to explore and test how communities of practice could facilitate the spread of large-scale change across England’s voluntary sector working for health and wellbeing.

This report reflects on their experiences over the last 3 years, and in the spirit of communities of practice, aims to share reflections in order that others can use the learning.

Click here to view the full report.