Online support: investigating the role of public online forums in mental health

The King’s Fund, April 2017

This report was written by the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media at Demos in partnership with The King’s Fund. It looks at the large amounts of mental health related discussion taking place on public online forums, and explores whether computational techniques can provide robust, actionable insight from these conversations. It describes the collection and analysis of one million publicly available forum posts and addresses the technical and ethical challenges posed by the collection and analysis of online forum data.

Click here to view the report.


Public satisfaction with the NHS and social care in 2016: results and trends from the British Social Attitudes survey

The King’s Fund, March 2017

The British public’s satisfaction with the NHS remained steady in 2016, according to the data contained in this report. The findings from the British Social Attitudes survey, carried out by the National Centre for Social Research between July and October 2016, show 63 per cent of people were satisfied with the NHS. The change in satisfaction since 2015 (when it was 60 per cent) is not statistically significant. Satisfaction remains high by historic standards, but is seven percentage points below its peak of 70 per cent in 2010.

Click here to view this report.

Delivering sustainability and transformation plans: from ambitious proposals to credible plans

The King’s Fund, February 2017

Sustainability and transformation plans (STPs) have been developed in 44 footprints across England, with the aim of transforming care in line with the NHS five year forward view. But can the proposals in STPs be delivered? Our new report looks in detail at the content of the 44 STPs and the opportunities and challenges for implementation. The report is accompanied by a short briefing that discusses the seven key opportunities and challenges facing the STPs.

Click here to view the full report.

The NHS if…essay competition

The King’s Fund, October 2016

The King’s Fund are holding an essay competition to stimulate new thinking and writing about the future of the NHS. They’d like to invite you to write your own essay exploring a future scenario for the NHS, considering the potential impact on the health system and wider society. An expert panel of judges will select the winning essay, which will be published on The NHS if… website. The competition is open to anyone with an interest in the future of health and care in England. You might work in health and care, or be a student of health policy and management, science communication or wider social and political issues. Or you may be a patient or carer who can use your own experience to help explore a future scenario for the NHS.

Click here to find out more.

Commitments to increase mental health funding not reaching the front line

King’s Fund, October 2016

Analysis by the King’s Fund shows that 40 per cent of mental health trusts saw their income fall in 2015/16. This is despite the government’s commitment to parity of esteem for mental health and assurances from NHS England that almost 90 per cent of plans submitted by clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) last year included mental health funding increases.  The findings are based on analysis of the annual accounts of all 58 mental health trusts in England. Given that mental health trusts provide about 80 per cent of all mental health care, the fact that income fell in so many trusts last year provides a clear indication that the promised funding increases are not reaching the front line.

Click here for further information on this analysis.

Social care for older people: Home truths

The King’s Fund, September 2016

This report, published jointly with the Nuffield Trust, looks at the current state of social care services for older people in England and considers the impact of cuts in local authority spending on social care providers and on older people, their families and carers. The picture that emerges is of social care providers under pressure, struggling to retain staff, maintain quality and stay in business; local authorities making unenviable choices about where to make reductions; a complex set of causes of delays in discharging older people from hospital; and the voluntary sector keeping services going even when funding was curtailed.

Click here to read the full report.