Prevalence and economic burden of medication errors in the NHS in England: Rapid evidence synthesis and economic analysis of the prevalence and burden of medication error in the UK

University of Sheffield Policy Research Unit in Economic Evaluation of Health & Care Interventions, March 2018

Report that estimates approximately 66 million potentially clinically significant errors occur per year, 71.0% of these in primary care. This is where most medicines in the NHS are prescribed and dispensed. Prescribing in primary care accounts for 33.9% of all potentially clinically significant errors. It estimates NHS costs of definitely avoidable Adverse Drug Reactions as £98.5 million per year, consuming 181,626 beddays, causing 712 deaths, and contributing to 1,708 deaths.

Click here to view the full report.

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Mental health rehabilitation inpatient services: Ward types, bed numbers and use by clinical commissioning groups and NHS trusts

Care Quality Commission, March 2018

Report from the Care Quality Commission looking at mental health rehabilitation inpatient services that finds:

  1. People are often receiving care a long way from where they live and from their support networks, which in turn can affect their onward recovery and wellbeing.
  2. People are being accommodated in services that are ‘dislocated’ from their home areas. This is more prevalent in the independent sector than in NHS services on average (49km) compared with NHS patients (14km).
  3. The independent sector
    1. Provided more wards that were categorised as either locked rehabilitation or complex care (75% of wards of this type) and fewer wards categorised as long stay, community or high dependency (25% of beds of this type).
    2. Accommodated patients who had been on that particular ward for longer (median 444 days compared with 230 days in the NHS) and in hospital continuously for longer (median 952 days compared with 492 days in the NHS).
    3. Because of the longer length of stay, accommodated patients whose current placement had cost twice as much (median £162K compared with £81K)

4. There is very wide variation between CCG areas in the use of rehabilitation beds, and in the use of beds that are out of area.
The report estimates that the annual expenditure on mental health rehabilitation beds is about £535 million. Out of area placements account for about two-thirds of this expenditure.   The 10% of CCGs that fund the highest number of places are spending an average of at least £19,000 per day on this element of provision – of which £8,200 is spent on independent sector provision; the majority of which is out of area.

Click here to view the full report.

Learning from the vanguards: spreading and scaling up change

NHS Clinical Commissioners, February 2018

This briefing looks at what can be learned from the vanguards’ efforts to design, test and deliver a variety of scalable and replicable new care models. It shares the lessons that other organisations and partnerships can take from the vanguards’ experiences.

Click here to view this report.

Learning from the vanguards: supporting people and communities to stay well

NHS Clinical Commissioners, February 2018

This briefing looks at what the vanguards set out to achieve when it comes to supporting people and communities to stay well. It highlights the work some of the vanguards have been doing and shares the lessons that other organisations and partnerships can take from the vanguards’ experiences.

Click here to view this report.

Learning from the vanguards: staff at the heart of new care models –

NHS Clinical Commissioners, February 2018

This briefing looks at what the vanguards set out to achieve when it comes to involving and engaging staff in the new care models. It highlights the work some of the vanguards have been doing and shares the lessons that other organisations and partnerships can take from the vanguards’ experiences.

Click here to view this report.

The risks to care quality and staff wellbeing of an NHS system under pressure

The Picker Institute, February 2018

Report  jointly authored by The Picker Institute and The King’s Fund on the impact of pressure on staff as a result of the current pressures on the NHS.  It finds that staff experience was associated with sickness absence rates, spend on agency staff and staffing levels. This indicates that staff wellbeing is impacted negatively by a workforce that is overstretched and supplemented by temporary staff. The consequence of this is that patient experience is also negatively associated with workforce factors: higher spend on agency staff, fewer doctors and especially fewer nurses per bed, and bed occupancy results in a poorer patient experience.

Click here to view this report.

Left to chance: the health and care nursing workforce supply in England

Royal College of Nursing, February 2018

Report from the Royal College of Nursing that finds the current approach to workforce planning in England is fragmented and incomplete, with no clear national accountability for ensuring that nursing staff with the right skills arrive in the right parts of the health care system at the right time. The lack of comprehensive data on current nursing staff and training numbers means that national workforce planning is incoherent, and credible workforce strategy impossible.  It notes that since nurse bursaries were abolished, the 2018 applications to UCAS for nursing courses have seen a 13% fall compared to the same time last year, a total fall of 33% since the same time in January 2016.

Click here to view the report.