Arts for health and wellbeing

The Welsh NHS Confederation, August 2018

Engagement with the arts can make a powerful contribution to a person’s mental health and wellbeing. This briefing provides an overview of the ways that NHS Wales is realising this opportunity and improving outcomes for patients.

Click here to view the full report.

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Heatwave plan for England: Protecting health and reducing harm from severe heat and heatwaves

Public Health England, August 2018

Updated Heatwave Plan for England which aims to prepare for, alert people to, and prevent, the major avoidable effects on health during periods of severe heat in England.

It recommends a series of steps to reduce the risks to health from prolonged exposure to severe heat for:

  • the NHS, local authorities, social care, and other public agencies
  • professionals working with people at risk
  • individuals, local communities and voluntary groups

Click here to view the full report.

Supporting line managers to foster engagement

NHS Employers, July 2018

This briefing explores work that can be done to support and develop line managers to improve staff engagement across NHS organisations. It is based on the issues raised by line managers within the NHS and looks at challenges for staff engagement. It outlines suggestions on how organisations can support line managers to manage in way that supports engagement, and is full of useful advice, hints and tips.

Click here to view the report.

Investigation Into The Transition From Child And Adolescent Mental Health Services To Adult Mental Health Services

Healthcare Safety Investigation Bureau, July 2018

Reviews the transition from children and adolescent mental health services to understand how variations in the transition impacts the safe and effective care of young people. It makes a number of recommendations to national NHS organisations to make the transition smoother and safer for young people.

Click here to view the full report.

Learning from deaths Guidance for NHS trusts on working with bereaved families and carers

NHS England, July 2018

The learning from deaths national guidance is for NHS trusts on working with bereaved families and carers. It advises trusts on how they should support, communicate and engage with families following a death of someone in their care.  Included is information for families following a bereavement has been prepared with the support of families, trusts and other stakeholders. These documents aim to explain what happens next; including information about how to comment on the care your loved one received and what happens if a death will be looked into by a coroner.

Click here to read this guidance.

What will new technology mean for the NHS and its patients?: Four big technological trends

The Nuffield Trust, June 2018

Report that considers the potential impact of the following technologies to improve health care.:

  • Genomics and precision medicine can target treatment interventions at specific sub-groups of patients, potentially making them more effective and opening up new therapeutic possibilities.
  • Remote care can improve access to health care services, enabling patient needs to be addressed as early as possible and potentially making systems more efficient.
  • Technology-supported self-management can help to empower patients to better manage and understand their condition, supporting improved behavioural and clinical outcomes.
  • Data can provide new ways for the NHS to learn, improve and generate new research – alongside artificial intelligence (AI), which is providing new analytical capacity for diagnosing patients, effective triage and logistics.

Click here to view this report.

Are we expecting too much from the NHS?

Nuffield Trust, June 2018

Paper that explores the public’s expectations of the NHS, the balance between meeting those expectations and living within a constrained budget, and the question of who is responsible for keeping us healthy. It finds:

  • The public strongly identifies with the values and founding principles of the NHS. Recent polling suggests people are becoming increasingly concerned about the NHS, particularly in relation to lengthening waiting times and the level of funding provided by the government.
  • Resources for health care are finite; all health systems are required to make choices about how to allocate funds. However, a prolonged funding squeeze combined with rising demand has resulted in the NHS having to take increasingly difficult decisions at both local and national level, with the NHS currently struggling to meet core standards within its budget. The announcement in June of additional funding for the NHS is welcome but it does not provide the long-term cure that would restore it to full health. Further hard choices lie ahead and polling suggests the public is reluctant to accept measures perceived as ‘rationing’.
  • Underpinning the NHS is the idea of a contract between the individual and health services. In England, the NHS Constitution sets out the public’s rights and the NHS’s commitments, together with individual responsibilities. Most people accept they have a responsibility to contribute to their own health and wellbeing.
  • The most important influence on people’s health is the economic, physical and social environment in which they live. Consequently, while the NHS and individuals can play their part, it is essential that together, national and local government use the levers they have at their disposal (such as tax and regulation) to foster healthy environments. New polling suggests that the public are more receptive to such interventions than politicians often suppose.

Click here to view the full report.

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