Drug and alcohol addiction, and obesity: effects on employment outcomes

Department for Work and Pensions, December 2016

The government asked Professor Dame Carol Black to undertake an independent review into how best to support people who are addicted to alcohol or drugs, or are obese, to start, return or remain in work.

This review provides an evidence-based analysis of the factors that stand in the way of employment and recommends practical interventions to help overcome them.

Click here to access the report.

British Social Attitudes: Attitudes to obesity

NatCen Social Research, December 2016

PHE commissioned NatCen Social Research to include a set of questions in its British Social Attitudes survey to understand the public’s view of obesity and related issues. This report presents NatCen’s analysis of the results.

The primary findings show that people underestimate their weight and struggle to identify the point when someone becomes obese. Almost two thirds of adults are overweight or obese. All of this combined suggests being overweight or obese is normalised in society.

Click here to view this report.

Fiscal policies for diet and the prevention of noncommunicable diseases

World Health Organization, October 2016

This report argues that taxing sugary drinks can lower consumption and reduce obesity, type 2 diabetes and tooth decay. The report predicts that fiscal policies that lead to at least a 20 per cent increase in the retail price of sugary drinks would result in proportional reductions in consumption of such products.

Click here to view the full report.

Statistics on Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet – England, 2016

HSCIC, May 2016

This statistical report from the Health and Social Care Information Centre (HSCIC) presents a range of information on obesity, physical activity and diet, drawn together from a variety of sources.  The report is split into four sections covering; overweight and obesity prevalence among adults and children; health outcomes, including health risks, hospital admissions and prescription drugs used for treatment of obesity; physical activity levels among adults and children and diet among adults and children, including trends in purchases, and consumption of food and drink and energy intake.

Click here to view the report

Making Every Contact Count Bulletin – April 2016

Library and Information Service, April 2016

This Library bulletin provides further reading to support the ‘Making Every Contact Count’ programme.

There are links to recent research papers and articles in each of the MECC areas to give you further background information and evidence to consolidate what you have learned in your training, and to give you ideas and confidence for using MECC in your day-to-day encounters.

This issue features recent Cochrane reviews on workplace interventions for reducing sitting, dietary fibre for prevention of cardiovascular disease and combined interventions for smoking cessation, as well as other peer-reviewed articles.  There is also a link to resources for implementing MECC and a report on why people struggle to make behavioural changes and what can be done to overcome these hurdles.

Click here to view the bulletin.

You will need to login with your Athens account to view the articles in this bulletin unless it is indicated that they are “Open Access”.  All LCFT staff and students are eligible to register for an Athens account.  Please click here to register for an account or contact the Library.

Beverage purchases from stores in Mexico under the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages: observational study

BMJ, 6 January 2016

This study looks at the effect on purchases of beverages from stores in Mexico one year after implementation of the excise tax on sugar sweetened beverages.

The study finds that the tax on sugar sweetened beverages was associated with reductions in purchases of taxed beverages and increases in purchases of untaxed beverages. Continued monitoring is needed to understand purchases longer term, potential substitutions, and health implications.

Click here to read the full article.

Tipping the scales: why preventing obesity makes economic sense

The King’s Fund, January 2016

This report, written with Cancer Research UK, finds that rising rates of obesity could lead to 700,000 new cancer cases in the UK, as well as millions of new cases of type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease and stroke. This would cost the NHS an additional £2.5 billion a year by 2035, over and above what is already spent on obesity related disease. However, the study shows that small changes can have dramatic impacts – for example, a one per cent reduction in the number of overweight or obese people every year could prevent more than 64,000 cancer cases over the next 20 years and save the NHS £300 million in 2035 alone.

Click here to read the full report.

Click here to read the executive summary.