Health, Ageing and Support: survey of views of people aged 50 and over: A study for the Department of Health

Department of Health and Social Care, May 2018

This report provides the results from an Ipsos MORI survey of the views of people aged 50 or over on health, ageing and support. The survey was conducted on behalf of the Department of Health and Social Care, and fieldwork took place between 4 January and 21 February 2016.  Key findings are:

  • People aged 50 and over take their physical and mental health seriously; they name numerous actions they take to maintain their health. Eating healthily is seen as important for both physical and mental health.
  • However, nearly half do not think a healthy lifestyle can prevent dementia.
  • Loneliness is seen as a big problem for older people and people aged 50 and over think society is not doing enough to prevent it.
  • Attitudes to care and support services are mixed but generally less positive than we see for the NHS. There are still large numbers unable to give an opinion either way (as seen in the 2015 Public Perceptions of the NHS and Social Care Tracker Survey).
  • There are doubts over whether hospitals provide the same standard of emergency care seven days a week.
  • There is a long way to go in terms of uptake of new digital channels, but this age group (who are higher service users) are more likely than the general public to have used them.
  • There is a lot more to do to ensure people prepare for future care costs and have the support they need to care for those close to them.

Click here to view the full report.

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Voices from the social care crisis :An opportunity to end a broken system, once and for all –

The Care and Support Alliance, May 2018

Care and Support Alliance report on how the social care crisis is affecting the day to day lives of older people, working aged disabled people and unpaid carers across the country.  It identifies that currently at least 1.2 million older people and disabled people do not receive the care they require, a number which has almost doubled since 2010.  An estimated £6.3bn will have been taken out of adult social care in real terms since 2010 and the cuts to budgets between 2010 and 2017 now total 49%.

Calls on the Government to develop  a social care system creates independence and that ensures recipients not only get the basics, but also have access to the care and support they need to lead fulfilling and healthy lives.  It should be preventative, high quality and deliver person-centered care and support.  It should not rely on the NHS having to save the day when there’s no other support on offer.

Click here to view the full report.

An Evaluation of the Standing Together Project

Mental Health Foundation, May 2018

The Standing Together project sought investigate the impact of peer-support groups on the health and wellbeing of older people. This report outlines the results of the project evaluation and it finds evidence to suggest that peer-support groups can help to increase social connectedness among older people, thus improving their quality of life.

Click here to view the full report.

Adding extra years to life and extra life to those years: Local government guide to healthy ageing

Local Government Association, March 2018

The population is ageing. Over the last 10 years the number of people aged over 65 in England increased by a fifth – that’s nearly 1.7 million extra older people. But while the greater longevity is to be welcomed, far too many of those later years are being spent in poor health. That is bad for the individual and bad for the state. The longer a person spends in poor health the more health and care they need, so tackling it is a priority for local government aiming to reduce the impact of long-term conditions, turn the tide and make sure that those in old age are able to maintain their health, wellbeing and independence for as long as possible.

Click here to view the report.

Medicines optimisation in care homes: Programme overview

NHS England, March 2018

This document sets out the process for how the Pharmacy Integration Fund (PhIF) will be deployed to support the Medicines optimisation in care homes (MOCH) programme in 2018/19 and 2019/20. It sets out the background to the programme and describes the scope, objectives and expected outcomes for care home residents. This programme aims to recruit pharmacists into care homes to help reduce overmedication and cut unncessary hospital stays.

Click here to view the full report.

ODESSA: Optimising care delivery models to support ageing-in-place

University of Sheffield, March 2018

This report brings together international research findings on current long-term care delivery models for older people and assesses the key factors that allow them to live independently for longer.  It reports on a  three-year project investigated new and innovative ways of adapting a person’s home so that they can live independently for longer and avoid going into residential care as well as making it easier for them to access public services such as health and social services.

Click here to view the full report.