Coping through Football: evaluation report 2018

Centre for Mental Health, September 2018

Does the ‘Coping Through Football’ programme deliver benefits to the physical and mental health of people living with mental health difficulties? Coping Through Football was founded by London Playing Fields Foundation, who started the initiative in 2005 in collaboration with North East London Foundation Trust and Leyton Orient Trust. It was conceived in response to the fact that the biggest cause of death of 20-49 year old men was suicide and that given that community mental health services were stretched to the limit, there was an over reliance on medication as a treatment. The report finds that for two out of three participants (39% of whom have schizophrenia) there was a positive change in lifestyle choices around healthy eating and smoking. 54% of participants went on to volunteering, education and training or employment. The report also records that there was a 12% reduction in the number of overnight hospital stays for those who were involved in the project. The report that the Coping Through Football programme is a low-cost intervention in the mental health sector. The cost of one person attending the programme every week for a year was £1,700, which is equivalent to four days in a mental health inpatient bed, or five A&E attendances. Our analysis also highlighted that “the annual cost of Coping Through Football for one year is the equivalent of the costs of schizophrenia to society for just over one person.

Click here to view the report.

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Getting my life back: Occupational therapy promoting mental health and wellbeing in England

Royal College of Occupational Therapists, May 2018

Report by the Royal College of Occupational Therapists to demonstrate the value of occupational therapy in England. The report assesses the impact of occupational therapy in four keys areas:

  • helping young people to achieve their educational potential,
  • supporting people with mental health issue into employment,
  • improving the physical health of people with serious mental health problems
  • leading innovative service delivery that improves access to mental health support in primary care.

Click here to view the full report.

The role of home adaptations in improving later life

Centre for Ageing Better, November 2017

This review provides evidence to make the case for the importance and effectiveness of adaptations, primarily to influence policy-makers at national and local levels, practitioners and local commissioners. The objective is to strengthen their focus on housing in their strategic plans, and commit increased effort and resources to delivering both more extensive, better coordinated, more timely and personalised repair and adaptations services and better information and advice services.

Click here to view the full report.

An Occupational Therapist’s Access Checklist – a Practical Tool

Housing LIN, November 2017

This checklist has been developed as a quick reference tool, to support decisions when making recommendations for the design of accessible and inclusive housing, when there may be a case to be made for exceeding the minimum requirements laid out in the Building Regulations.  It provides comparative information from a selection of design guidance on the specifications for dimensions and layout, from minimum requirements to more generous provision. Detailed reasoning is outlined in the respective documents. It is arranged as a list that details specific aspects of accommodation from the parking and approach to communal access, and internal layouts.

Click here to view the checklist.

Allied health professions into action: using AHPs to transform health, care and wellbeing

NHS England, January 2017

This document is a vision of how, with collective action, our nation would be different if all AHPs were used effectively. Aimed at leaders and decision makers, to help them understand the transformative potential and role of AHPs within the health, social and wider care system. The document provides examples of innovative AHP practice and a framework to help develop local delivery plans.

Click here to view the report.

Occupational therapy delivered by specialists versus non-specialists for people with schizophrenia

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, October 2016

This review protocol was co-written by Graeme Reid, Consultant Clinical Psychologist at Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust.

The objectives are to examine the effects of occupational therapy delivered by occupational therapists compared to occupational therapy delivered by any other person for people with schizophrenia. Our secondary objectives are to determine whether the response differs by specific type (e.g. hospital versus non-hosptial setting), intensity (e.g. more therapist contact time or more frequent task repetition), or duration of occupational therapy.

Click here to access this protocol.