Parc Prison: An evaluation of peer-led self-management training within a prison setting

Mental Health Foundation, February 2017

The Mental Health Foundation in partnership with G4S delivered self-management with peer support courses to vulnerable prisoners at HMP & YOI Parc between October 2013 and December 2016.  This report presents the findings from an evaluation of prisoners who took part in the self-management training as well as facilitators and other key stakeholders involved in the development of the project. Hearing from prisoners directly gives us an insight into how self-management can give them an opportunity to see beyond the boundaries of their current situation, support them to achieve realistic goals and build positive relationships that all work towards improving wellbeing.

Click here to view the full report.

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Preventing suicides: staff perspectives

Centre for Mental Health, February 2017

This report is based on interviews with health care staff working in prisons and those reviewing clinical care following suicide deaths. It finds that the majority of prisoners have multiple and complex needs including poor mental health, but many do not get access to mental health support. It concludes that prisons need to shift from a primarily punitive approach to a culture centred on wellbeing, recovery and rehabilitation.  The report makes recommendations to improve safety and wellbeing of prisoners.

Click here to view the full report.

Traumatic brain injury and offending: An economic analysis

Centre for Mental Health, July 2016

Over a million people in this country live with the consequences of traumatic brain injury, at a cost to the economy of around £15 billion a year.

This report sheds light on head injury (in which the brain is damaged by impact, such as from a fall, a road accident or violence), and the risks it poses. The report finds that a head injury doubles a person’s risk of later mental health problems, even if the person had no prior history of mental ill-health.

Traumatic brain injury also has a marked impact on the economy, at a cost of £15 billion a year. This figure comprises of lost work contributions, premature death and health and social care costs. This £15 billion does not, however, include the human costs of head injury on people’s wellbeing and quality of life, which is clearly the biggest cost.

Click here  for further information and to download the report.

Mental health and criminal justice: views from consultations across England & Wales

Centre for Mental Health, April 2016

With extremely high rates of mental ill-health among the prison population, this report draws on experiences from across England and Wales to determine the way forward for improvement. It finds that few of the prisons represented at the events were able to offer psychological therapies, and that primary mental health care remains the weakest element of mental health support in prisons.

Click here to view the full report.

Prison health: health and justice annual report

Public Health England, June 2015
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Public Health England works in partnership to identify and meet the health and social care needs of people in prisons and other prescribed places of detention (PPDs), as well as those in contact with the criminal justice system (CJS) in the community.

This report captures a broad range of activity led by the national health and justice team in PHE working both across our own organisation and with a broad range of partners internationally, nationally and locally across all the domains of public health practice.

Click here for further information and to download the report.

Care After Death: Guidance for staff responsible for care after death (Second edition)

Hospice UK, May 2015

First published in 2011, the ‘Guidance for staff responsible for care after death’ showed that care after death is the first stage of a process which involves a range of professional groups and that coordinated working is vital if the process is to run smoothly. Endorsed by three royal colleges and other national organisations, the focus of the second edition has been extended to include recommendations relating to the training of staff and to addressing deaths in mental health services and prisons. Author: Jo Wilson on behalf of National Nurse Consultant Group (Palliative Care).

Click here to download the guidance.