Old problems, new solutions: Improving acute psychiatric care for adults in England – Final report

The Commission to Review the Provision of Acute Inpatient Psychiatric Care for Adults, February 2016

Urgent action is needed to improve acute psychiatric care for severely ill adult mental health patients in England.  This report describes widespread problems with finding beds or receiving good home treatment but it also points to the improvements that can be made and gives examples where people are being well cared for in good services.

Click here to read the full report.


Improving acute inpatient psychiatric care for adults in England: interim report

The Commission on Acute Adult Psychiatric Care, July 2015

The Commission on Acute Adult Psychiatric Care was set up by the Royal College of Psychiatrists in response to widespread concerns about the provision of acute inpatient psychiatric beds and alternatives to admission available for patients. This interim report is based on the Commission’s initial observations about acute inpatient psychiatric services for adults in England and its discussions with patients, carers, advocates, health and social care professionals and policy makers. It finds that the so-called bed or admission crisis in adult mental health is very significantly a problem of discharges and alternatives to admission that can only be addressed through changes in services and management of the whole service.

Click here to view the full report.

Variation in compulsory psychiatric inpatient admission in England: a cross-sectional, multilevel analysis

National Institute for Health Research, December 2014

This paper seeks to quantify and model variances in the rate of compulsory admission to psychiatric inpatient wards in England at different spatial levels and to assess the extent to which this was explained by characteristics of people and places.

Click here for further information and to view the paper.