Forward thinking: NIHR research on support for people with severe mental illness

National Institute of Health Research, March 2018

Report from the National Institute of Health Research detailing 30 published studies funded by the National Institute of Health Research (NIHR) and additional examples of ongoing research that  provides an overview of recent research funded by the NIHR on the support for people living with severe mental illness.  The focus of research is on:

  • Support early detection and intervention
  • Focus on crisis care in terms of location, settings and practice
  • Stabilising, managing mental and physical health

Supporting recovery, self management and engagement.

Click here to view the full report.

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Impact of person-centred care training and person-centred activities on quality of life, agitation, and antipsychotic use in people with dementia living in nursing homes: A cluster-randomised controlled trial

PLOS Medicine, February 6, 2018

This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a person-centred care and psychosocial intervention incorporating an antipsychotic review, WHELD, on QoL, agitation, and antipsychotic use in people with dementia living in nursing homes, and to determine its cost.

Click here to view the paper.

Low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulceration: pragmatic, randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial (Aspirin4VLU)

BMJ 2017;359:j5157

This randomized controlled trial aims to determine the effect of low dose aspirin on ulcer healing in patients with venous leg ulcers.  The participants included 251 adults with venous leg ulcers who could safely be treated with aspirin or placebo: 125 were randomised to aspirin and 126 to placebo.  The conclusion of the study suggests that the findings do not support the use of low dose aspirin as adjuvant treatment for venous leg ulcers.

Click here to view the full text paper.

Modifiable pathways in Alzheimer’s disease: Mendelian randomisation analysis

BMJ 2017;359:j5375

This study aims to determine which potentially modifiable risk factors, including socioeconomic, lifestyle/dietary, cardiometabolic, and inflammatory factors, are associated with Alzheimer’s disease.  The design of the study is a Mendelian randomisation study using genetic variants associated with the modifiable risk factors as instrumental variables.  The study concludes that the results provide support that higher educational attainment is associated with a reduced risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

Click here to read the full text paper.

A framework for mental health research

Department of Health, December 2017

This framework provides a collective view of how mental health research should develop in the UK over the next decade. It sets out a structure to improve co-ordination and strengthen the focus on areas where mental health research is likely to translate into significant health benefit.

Click here to view the guidance.