Multi-agency statutory guidance on female genital mutilation

Home Office, April 2016

This multi-agency guidance on female genital mutilation (FGM) should be read and followed by all persons and bodies in England and Wales who are under statutory duties to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and vulnerable adults. It replaces female genital mutilation: guidelines to protect children and women (2014).

It is not intended to replace wider safeguarding guidance, but to provide additional advice on FGM.

Click here for further information and to download the guidance.

Advertisements

Safeguarding Adults – Everyone’s Responsibility: RCN guidance for nursing staff

Royal College of Nursing, July 2015

This RCN guidance outlines the key interventions that should be followed and provides signposts to resources that will help you understand the issues and the required actions. Safeguarding activity aims to ensure the best possible outcome

Click here to view the full guidance.

Female genital mutilation risk and safeguarding: Guidance for professionals

Department of Health, March 2015

This guidance provides practical help to support NHS organisations developing new safeguarding policies and procedures for female genital mutilation (FGM).

It can be used by health professionals from all sectors, particularly designated and named safeguarding leads, and local safeguarding children board members. It is based on existing best practice within the NHS.

Click here to download the guidance.

New adult safeguarding improvement tool published

NHS Confederation, 30 March 2015

The NHS Confederation has joined forces with four other leading national organisations to produce a new resource for those involved in adult safeguarding Рan improvement tool based on the Adult Safeguarding Standards.

Click here for further information and to download the tool.

Adult safeguarding – Signs and indicators of abuse: At a glance 69

Social Care Institute for Excellence, January 2015

People with care and support needs, such as older people or people with disabilities, are more likely to be abused or neglected. They may be seen as an easy target and may be less likely to identify abuse themselves or to report it. People with communication difficulties can be particularly at risk because they may not be able to alert others. Sometimes people may not even be aware that they are being abused, and this is especially likely if they have a cognitive impairment. Abusers may try to prevent access to the person they abuse.

Signs of abuse can often be difficult to detect. This At a glance briefing aims to help people who come into contact with people with care and support needs to identify abuse and recognise possible indicators. Many types of abuse are also criminal offences and should be treated as such.

Types of abuse:

Physical abuse
Domestic violence or abuse
Sexual abuse
Psychological or emotional abuse
Financial or material abuse
Modern slavery
Discriminatory abuse
Organisational or institutional abuse
Neglect or acts of omission
Self-neglect or self-abuse

Click here to view the full briefing.

Police chief calls for records access

E-Health Insider, 11 August 2014

Police should be given greater access to medical records without patient consent, a senior police chief has argued in an interview in which he also called for a register of vulnerable people to be set up to facilitate this…

Click here to view the full article.