Antidepressant Controlled Trial For Negative Symptoms In Schizophrenia (ACTIONS): a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised clinical trial

National Institute of Health Research, April 2016

Negative symptoms of schizophrenia represent deficiencies in emotional responsiveness, motivation, socialisation, speech and movement. When persistent, they are held to account for much of the poor functional outcomes associated with schizophrenia. There are currently no approved pharmacological treatments. While the available evidence suggests that a combination of antipsychotic and antidepressant medication may be effective in treating negative symptoms, it is too limited to allow any firm conclusions.

This trial aims to establish the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of augmentation of antipsychotic medication with the antidepressant citalopram for the management of negative symptoms in schizophrenia.

Click here to access the full text paper.

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Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of body psychotherapy in the treatment of negative symptoms of schizophrenia: A multicentre randomised controlled trial

NIHR Health Technology Assessment programme, February 2016

The negative symptoms of schizophrenia significantly impact on quality of life and social functioning, and current treatment options are limited. In this study the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of group body psychotherapy as a treatment for negative symptoms were compared with an active control.

Click here for more information and to download the full text article.

A ‘smart’ way to spot schizophrenia signs

BBC News, 31 October 2015

Emily Eisner, PhD Student at the University of Manchester is currently completing a research project, ExPRESS 2 in Adult Mental Health and Early Intervention Services at Lancashire Care Foundation Trust.  She has recently had an article about the study published on the BBC news website.

Click here to read her article.

Pathways to Recovery: A case for adoption of systematic pathways in psychosis

Imperial College Health Partners, September 2015

This joint briefing paper published with Wessex AHSN, sets out how ICHP have developed new, integrated care pathways for mental health that prescribe time frames around clinical interventions and service delivery.  These new psychosis pathways aim to reduce the impact of disease and promote recovery by ensuring that every individual gets the best evidence based care at the right time and in the right place. The approach has used a robust methodology which can be adopted for use across the wider NHS. This document describes the approach used in developing the pathways and provides a guide for patients, carers, provider organisations and commissioners on adoption and implementation.

Click here for further information and to download the briefing paper.