Guides for carers of people with schizophrenia

SANE, February 2016

The charity SANE has launched two new guides for the families and carers of people with schizophrenia.  The guides provide information about the care planning process and the range of support and services available to families and carers.

Click here for further information and to access the guides.

Advertisements

A ‘smart’ way to spot schizophrenia signs

BBC News, 31 October 2015

Emily Eisner, PhD Student at the University of Manchester is currently completing a research project, ExPRESS 2 in Adult Mental Health and Early Intervention Services at Lancashire Care Foundation Trust.  She has recently had an article about the study published on the BBC news website.

Click here to read her article.

Pathways to Recovery: A case for adoption of systematic pathways in psychosis

Imperial College Health Partners, September 2015

This joint briefing paper published with Wessex AHSN, sets out how ICHP have developed new, integrated care pathways for mental health that prescribe time frames around clinical interventions and service delivery.  These new psychosis pathways aim to reduce the impact of disease and promote recovery by ensuring that every individual gets the best evidence based care at the right time and in the right place. The approach has used a robust methodology which can be adopted for use across the wider NHS. This document describes the approach used in developing the pathways and provides a guide for patients, carers, provider organisations and commissioners on adoption and implementation.

Click here for further information and to download the briefing paper.

The HELPER programme: HEalthy Living and Prevention of Early Relapse – three exploratory randomised controlled trials of phase-specific interventions in first-episode psychosis.

Marshall M, Barrowclough C, Drake R, Husain N, Lobban F, Lovell K, Wearden A, Bradshaw T, Day C, Fitzsimmons M, Pedley R, Piccuci R, Picken A, Larkin W, Tomenson B, Warburton J, Gregg L.

Programme Grants for Applied Research; Vol. 3, No. 2.

Schizophrenia represents a substantial cost to the NHS and society because it is common (lifetime prevalence around 0.5–1%); it begins in adolescence or early adulthood and often causes lifelong impairment. The first 3 years are a ‘critical period’ in which the course of the illness is determined. Hence under the NHS Plan, specialist early intervention in psychosis services were established to care for people who develop psychosis between the ages of 14 and 35 years for the first 3 years of their illness. However, there has been a lack of evidence-based treatments specifically designed for the early years. This is important because emerging evidence has shown that in the critical period it is vital to avoid relapse and prevent deterioration in physical health, as both can drastically reduce the chances of a full recovery….

Congratulations to Prof Max Marshall, Mike Fitzsimmons and Warren Larkin of LCFT on the publication of this new research.

Click here to access the full text paper.

Psychosis and schizophrenia in adults

NICE, February 2015

 NICE quality standards describe high-priority areas for quality improvement in a defined care or service area. Each standard consists of a prioritised set of specific, concise and measurable statements. They draw on existing guidance, which provides an underpinning, comprehensive set of recommendations, and are designed to support the measurement of improvement.

This quality standard covers the treatment and management of psychosis and schizophrenia (including related psychotic disorders such as schizoaffective disorder, schizophreniform disorder and delusional disorder) in adults (18 years and older) with onset before the age of 60 years in primary, secondary and community care. It will not cover adults with transient psychotic symptoms.

Click here to view the guidance.