Making The Difference: Breaking the link between school exclusion and social exclusion: 60-second Summary

Institute for Public Policy Research, August 2018

Institute for Public Policy Research, report that notes excluded children are the most vulnerable: twice as likely to be in the care of the state, four times more likely to have grown up in poverty, seven times more likely to have a special educational need and 10 times more likely to suffer recognised mental health problems. Yet our education system is profoundly ill-equipped to break a cycle of disadvantage for these young people.  A new programme should be established, committed to delivering the best in education to the most vulnerable children. Run by a dedicated education charity, leaders graduating from this new programme – The Difference – would be a catalyst for change throughout the education system.

Click here to view the report.

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Obesity, healthy eating and physical activity in primary schools: A thematic review into what actions schools are taking to reduce childhood obesity

Ofsted, July 2018

Ofsted report that looks at the actions primary schools are taking to reduce childhood obesity. Emphasises that schools
should be reinforcing messages, imparting knowledge and developing skill are what schools do – and do well. In the shared effort to tackle obesity, schools should focus on improving those things they are best placed to do:

  • planning a challenging and well-sequenced curriculum, including learning about the body in PE and science about healthy eating and cooking
  • providing ample opportunity for children to take physical exercise during the school day – with lots of opportunities to ‘get out of breath’
  • teaching particular skills like how to cook or how to dance
  • updating parents on their children’s physical development such as agility, balance and coordination.

Click here to view the full report.

Protecting children during an outbreak: immunisation in schools

Public Health England, July 2018

This guidance covers:

  • the rationale behind offering vaccination in schools during an outbreak
  • the evidence of the effectiveness of programmes delivered in schools
    a range of consent advice

It is available to download only and is suitable for healthcare professionals, headteachers and all school staff.

Click here to view the guidance.

What Really Matters in Children and Young People’s Mental Health

Children & Young People’s Mental Health Coalition, November 2016

This report is based on the findings of the Values-Based Child and Adolescent Mental Health System Commission, Chaired by Baroness Claire Tyler of Enfield.

The report makes a total of ten recommendations, including calling on governments to formally recognise schools as a crucial component of the Child and Adolescent Mental Health System in the following ways:

  • Schools should be able to teach children and young people about mental health in the same way they teach them about literacy or numeracy
  • Undertake mental health impact assessments to ensure that both schools/education policy and wider government policy and legislation are not detrimental to children and young people’s mental health
  • Ensure that schools are able to identify mental health issues and can easily signpost pupils to relevant support, either within the school or their local community, and have the accountability to do this.

Click here to view the full report.

Measuring and monitoring children and young people’s mental wellbeing: A toolkit for schools

Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, October 2016

This toolkit aims to raise awareness amongst school and college staff of the range of validated tools that are available to help measure subjective mental wellbeing amongst the student population. This, in turn, will help school and college leaders make use of school and college level data to identify the mental wellbeing needs of students and determine how best to address them.

Click here to view the toolkit.

Lightning review: school nurses – children’s access to school nurses to improve wellbeing and protect them from harm

Children’s Commissioner, September 2016

This report finds that school nurses spend twice as much time on paperwork than on direct work with children in schools which potentially reduces their capacity to identify children at risk of neglect or abuse. The research also identified evidence that time pressures meant that the school nurse role in supporting and promoting child health and wellbeing, mental health, healthy relationships and sex education was being compromised.

Click here to view the full report.