Digital change in health and social care

The King’s Fund, June 2018

Report from the King’s Fund on the use of digital technology in health and social care can improve quality, efficiency and patient experience as well as supporting more integrated care and improving the health of a population. This report shares practical learning from a series of case studies where large-scale digital change is happening.

Click here to view the full report.

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Behind the Headlines: the battle to get care at home

Age UK, June 2018

Age UK report that finds families it seems, getting access to decent quality, reliable home care, and maintaining it, is a real battle. Key issues are:

  • Long waits to get an assessment
  • Services that are disjointed or simply unresponsive
  • Social services refusing to get involved
  • Fundamental lack of capacity in the system
  • Poor quality services and support
  • Support and services being cut back
  • Help for families providing care being withdrawn

Click here to view the full report.

Social care funding options: How much and where from?

The Health Foundation, May 2018

Report from the Health Foundation and Kings Fund that considers the costs associated with:

  • continuing the current social care system
  • introducing free personal care as exists in Scotland
  • raising the means test for receiving publicly funded care (the ‘floor’) and introducing a cap on total lifetime costs, as proposed in the Conservative Party manifesto for the 2017 general election.

It finds;

  • For the cap and floor model, cost above current pressures is £4.0bn in 2020/21 (taking account of the reduced spending on domiciliary care) rising to £5.8bn by 2030/31. The funding gap would be £5.5bn in 2020/21 and £11.9bn in 2030/31.
  • Free personal care would cost an extra £5.5bn in 2020/21 and £7.9bn by 2030/31. This would increase the estimated funding gap to £7bn in 2020/21 and £14bn in 2030/31.
  • The additional funding required for social care is large. To raise the funds in a sustainable way without cuts to other public services options include adding 1p to the main rate, higher rate and employers’ National Insurance contributions (NICs) by 2030/31, this would raise enough to fund the introduction of the cap and floor model. By means of winter fuel payments, this could be enough to introduce free personal care.
  • Additional revenue will need to be raised for adult social care services even without a change in the model. The question for government is whether, given that additional tax revenue will be required to protect the range and quality of care services, it would be better to aim for a sufficiently large increase in taxation to be able to provide a better model of care to those facing the burden of the cost.

Click here to view the full report.

Transgender awareness in child and family social work education

National Institute of Economic and Social Research, May 2018

This research provides evidence on:

  • transgender awareness in social work education and training
  • transgender awareness amongst child and family social workers
  • transgender people’s experiences of child and family social work in England

Click here to view the full report.

Voices from the social care crisis :An opportunity to end a broken system, once and for all –

The Care and Support Alliance, May 2018

Care and Support Alliance report on how the social care crisis is affecting the day to day lives of older people, working aged disabled people and unpaid carers across the country.  It identifies that currently at least 1.2 million older people and disabled people do not receive the care they require, a number which has almost doubled since 2010.  An estimated £6.3bn will have been taken out of adult social care in real terms since 2010 and the cuts to budgets between 2010 and 2017 now total 49%.

Calls on the Government to develop  a social care system creates independence and that ensures recipients not only get the basics, but also have access to the care and support they need to lead fulfilling and healthy lives.  It should be preventative, high quality and deliver person-centered care and support.  It should not rely on the NHS having to save the day when there’s no other support on offer.

Click here to view the full report.

Integrating Mental Health And Social Care: Does It Work In Practice?

Centre for Mental Health, May 2018

This briefing looks at the integration of mental health and social care, the benefits behind this and the challenges faced on the ground. It argues that the current pressures on both the health and care systems can conceal the day-to-day challenges of living with mental health problems, the distress of families and friends, and the struggle to stay well in their community.

Click here to view the full report.

Using Community Partnerships to Integrate Health and Social Services for High-Need, High-Cost Patients

The Commonwealth Fund, January 2018

Commonwealth Fund study that at efforts to integrate care in the United States that identifies five common challenges:

  1. inadequate strategies to sustain cost-savings, improvement, and funding;
  2. lack of accurate and timely measurement of return on investment;
  3. lack of mechanisms to share potential savings between health care and social services providers;#
  4. lack of expertise to integrate multiple data sources during health care or social services provision;
  5. lack of a cross-sector workflow evidence base.

Consensus is needed on the most appropriate payment models and ways to move away from fee-for-service.

Click here to view the report.