A Blueprint for a 100% Digitally Included Nation

Good Things Foundation, November 2018

Digital exclusion in the UK is holding back economic growth and stalling social inclusion. In 2018, 11.3million adults lack one or more of the basic digital skills for life and work. At current rates of progress, by 2028 there will still be 6.9 million people without these skills. In a world where we increasingly rely on digital in all areas of our lives, this is too slow. This report believed that everyone in the UK should have the confidence, skills, support and access to use digital technology to participate in society and benefit from the digital world. It calls for a faster move towards realising this aim and envisages a world where everyone has the opportunity to benefit from digital.

Click here to view the full report.

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A fair, supportive society: summary report

University College London Institute of Health Equity, November 2018

NHS England commissioned report that highlights that some of the most vulnerable people in society – those with learning disabilities – will die 15-20 years sooner on average than the general population. Much of the government action needed to improve life expectancy for people with disabilities is likely to reduce health inequalities for everyone. The report recommends that action should focus on the ‘social determinants of health’, particularly addressing poverty, poor housing, discrimination and bullying.

Click here to view the full report.

Social reintegration and employment: evidence and interventions for drug users in treatment

European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, September 2018

In order to help drug users become full members of society following treatment, measures are needed that address the issues of housing, education, vocational training and employment as part of their recovery. This report considers existing interventions targeting this vulnerable social group. It also provides a set of conclusions targeted at policymakers and drug practitioners, in order to help them develop coherent and comprehensive social integration strategies. Examples of ‘what works’ in practice are a vital first step in developing evidence-based guidelines for future interventions.

Click here to view the full report.

A tale of two cities: Community perspectives and narratives on inequality, struggle, hope and change

The Young Foundation, November 2017

This report presents community perspectives on what inequality is, and how it is experienced, struggled with and resisted. This research is based on three communities in a Northern city it aims to describe the lived experience of inequality to identify the boundaries of different types of power and decision making; how power feels to those who do not control budgets, spending and decide on services. Understanding the complexity of communities’ experience helps those who do control levers of power, finance and influence to develop better strategies to tackle inequality. Applying this understanding begins to identify opportunities for mutual and collaborative approaches which actively challenge inequalities instead of reproducing them.

Click here to read the full report.

Dying from inequality: socioeconomic disadvantage and suicidal behaviour

The Samaritans, March 2017

This report links higher risk of suicide with inequality and calls for greater awareness of the risks of suicide and for direct support to those with unstable employment, insecure housing, low income or in areas of socioeconomic deprivation.

Click here to view the full report.

A rough guide to early action: seven stories of how society is acting earlier

Community Links, May 2016

This case study report showcases seven stories of services and projects from across the UK that have acted earlier in dealing with social problems. It is part of an ongoing project from the Early Action Task Force, hosted by Community Links and supported by the Big Lottery Fund.

Click here to view the full report.

Gypsy and Traveller health: accommodation and living environment

Department of Health, January 2016

A report by the Traveller Movement, commissioned by the National Inclusion Health Board, looking at how the living conditions of Gypsies and Travellers lead to poor health.

The report found that:
•two-thirds of Gypsies and Travellers reported poor, bad, very bad or health
•the living conditions of Gypsies and Travellers significantly contribute to their physical and mental health
•the poor health of Gypsies and Travellers is made worse by their living environment, accommodation insecurity and community discrimination
•there needs to be closer partnership working across health and other interests to address these issues

Click here to read the report.