Stress: are we coping?

The Mental Health Foundation, May 2018

This report looks at the prevalence of stress in the UK and its implications. It also focuses on what we can do to manage and reduce stress and our recommendations for the government in creating a stress-free UK.  While stress isn’t a mental health problem in itself, it often leads to depression, anxiety, self-harm and suicide. It can also lead to physical health problems such as cardiovascular disease and joint and muscle problems.  The survey underpinning this report found almost three quarters (74%) of people have at some point felt so stressed that they felt overwhelmed or unable to cope.

Click here to view the full report.

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Mental health at work: the business costs ten years on

Centre for Mental Health, September 2017

This report updates a calculation made ten years ago, when mental health problems in the UK workforce were estimated to cost employers almost £26 billion. It finds that the cost is now £34.9 billion as a result of inflation and a rise in the size of the workforce since 2007. This means that mental health problems cost £1,300 for every employee in the UK economy.  The report finds that by far the largest part of the business cost is in the form of reduced productivity among people who are at work but unwell: or ‘presenteeism’. This costs businesses twice as much as sickness absence relating to poor mental health. The remainder of the cost relates to turnover – people leaving their jobs as a result of poor mental health.

Click here to read the full report.

New guidance to help NHS managers reduce stress in the workplace

NHS Employers, November 2014

NHS Employers have published comprehensive guidance to help managers throughout the NHS reduce stress in the workplace and better support staff who experience it.

For the past two years, 38 per cent of staff have told the NHS Staff Survey that they have suffered stress in the previous 12 months. NHS Employers also estimates that over 30 per cent of all sick leave is now caused by work-related stress in the NHS, costing up to £400 million each year.

Click here for further information and to download the guidance.