Life in ‘likes’: Children’s Commissioner report into social media use among 8-12 year olds

Children’s Commissioner, January 2018

Children’s Commissioner’s report on the effects of social media on 8-to-12-year-olds examines the way children use social media and its effects on their wellbeing. ‘Life in Likes’ fills a gap in research showing how younger children use platforms which social media companies say are not designed for them. Whilst most social media sites have an official age limit of 13 years, some research has suggested ¾ of 10-to-12 year olds have a social media account.

While 8-10s use social media in a playful, creative way – often to play games – this changes significantly as children’s social circles expand as they grow older. This report shows that many Year 7 children are finding social media hard to manage and becoming over-dependent on ‘likes’ and ‘comments’ for social validation. They are also adapting their offline behaviour to fit an online image, and becoming increasingly anxious about ‘keeping up appearances’ as they get older.

Click here to view the report.

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Bridging the gap between health and housing. A united approach in South Wales: (Case Study 140)

Housing LIN, November 2017

This report on the Caerphilly-based housing association United Welsh new wellbeing partnership, Wellbeing 4U, highlights how it is drawing from housing expertise to improve the patient and GP experience across 25 surgeries in Cardiff and Barry.

Click here to view the report.

 

Health at a glance 2017

OECD, November 2017

This report looks at data and trends on different aspects of health systems in OECD countries. The analysis of the UK health system finds that the overall health of Britons is similar to the OECD average but that obesity rates are considerably worse than the OECD average.

Click here to view the UK analysis.

Click here to access the full report.

Engage your Brain: ECBH Recommendations on Cognitively Stimulating Activities

Global Council on Brain Health, August 2017

This report from the Global Council on Brain Health investigates the evidence for how cognitively stimulating activities have a beneficial effect on brain health.  The report finds that the evidence to support the benefits of games and puzzles is weak to non-existent and suggests that other activities such as photography, dancing, Tai Chi, learning a language etc., may be more effective.

Click here to access this report.

Creative Health: The Arts for Health an Wellbeing

All-Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing, July 2017

The All-Party Parliamentary Group on Arts, Health and Wellbeing have held an inquiry into existing engagement of the arts in health and social care, with a view to making recommendations to improve policy and practice.

This report presents the findings of two years of research, evidence-gathering and discussions with patients, health and social care professionals, artists and arts administrators, academics, people in local government, ministers, other policy-makers and parliamentarians from both Houses of Parliament.

Click here to read the full report.

Click here to read the short report.

 

Enabling change through communities of practice: Wellbeing Our Way

National Voices, June 2017

In June 2014, National Voices set out to explore and test how communities of practice could facilitate the spread of large-scale change across England’s voluntary sector working for health and wellbeing.

This report reflects on their experiences over the last 3 years, and in the spirit of communities of practice, aims to share reflections in order that others can use the learning.

Click here to view the full report.

Healthy living: mosques

Public Health England, June 2017

The aim of this guide is to provide mosque leaders and communities with public health evidence and recommendations, demonstrating how these recommendations link into Islamic teachings, with case study examples from local mosques.  The guide includes a self-assessment checklist for mosques to reflect on current initiatives, identify gaps, recognise achievement and develop plans for future projects.

Click here to view this guidance.