How Should Health Policy Respond To The Growing Challenge Of Multimorbidity?: We need patient-centred care, with more emphasis on generalist rather than specialist care and better integration between general practice, hospitals and social care: (Policy Report 39)

University of Bristol, Policy Bristol, October 2018

The number of people with multiple long-term conditions, known as multimorbidity, is rising internationally, putting increased pressure on health care systems, including the NHS. Researchers from the 3D Study – the largest ever trial of a person-centred approach to caring for patients with multimorbidity in primary care. This report discusses the challenges facing general practice and how the health care system needs to respond.  People with multimorbidity – one or more long-term health conditions, such as diabetes, heart disease and dementia – are more likely to experience poor quality of life and poor physical and mental health. They use both general practice and hospital services far more often than the general population. However, healthcare systems around the world are largely designed to manage individual diseases or episodes of illness rather than patients with complex multiple health care needs.

Click here to view the full report.

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Delivering integrated care: the role of the multidisciplinary team: (SCIE Highlights No 4) –

Social Care Institute for Excellence, August 2018

Report that finds multidisciplinary team (MDTs) are likely to remain an important component of health and social care. It is important that those who create, lead and work in them are aware of both the pitfalls and opportunities of MDTs. The current integrated care developments in England and internationally should provide considerable evidence about their deployment within different populations. Learning from this evidence will enable us to understand when and how MDTs should be used in the future.  Key messages are:

  • Multidisciplinary teams (MDTs) have been shown to be an effective tool to facilitate collaboration between professionals and hence improve care outcomes.
  • Successful working requires at minimum an identified manager or coordinator, regular joint meetings and the effective sharing of electronic records.
  • Teams do not necessarily have to be located in the same premises to work successfully.
  • Multidisciplinary working can be approached in more than one way as the case studies in this briefing demonstrate.
  • The success of the MDT approach is not guaranteed: without strong organisation the impact may be negative rather than positive.
  • Ongoing integrated care developments should provide further evidence to enable development of an understanding how MDTs should be used in the future.

Click here to view the full report.

Growing innovative models of health, care and support for adults: Future of care Number 6

Social Care Institute for Excellence, January 2018

Briefing that identifies that innovation is needed more than ever as challenges grow. Innovation does not only mean technological breakthroughs or large restructures. New and better ways of delivering
relationship-based care are needed, and already exist, but are inconsistently implemented or poorly scaled.  It identifies the following requirements for innovation to flourish:

  • a shared ambition to ‘embed person- and community-centred ways of working across the system, using the best available tools and evidence’
  • co-production: planning with the people who have the greatest stake in our services from the beginning
  • a new model of leadership which is collaborative and convening
  • investment and commissioning approaches which transfer resources from low quality, low outcomes into approaches which work effectively
  • effective outcomes monitoring and use of data to drive change
  • a willingness to learn from experience.

Click here to view the full report.

Making sense of social prescribing

Social Prescribing Network, September 2017

This document provides an overview of various aspects of social prescribing such as: What is social prescribing; why do social prescribing; what do different models look like; what makes a good link worker; what makes a good referral; governance and risk management; evaluation.

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Treat as One Bridging the gap between mental and physical healthcare in general hospitals

National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death, January 2017

This report finds that failure by general hospitals to integrate physical and mental healthcare services is leading to poor care for patients with a physical illness who also happen to have a mental health condition. The report calls on general hospitals to integrate physical and mental healthcare services as a matter of urgency and makes recommendations for improvements.

Click here to read the full report.

Hospitals struggle to integrate physical and mental healthcare, inquiry finds

BMJ 2017;356:j411

Hospitals find it difficult to integrate physical and mental healthcare in people with mental health conditions who are admitted with a physical illness, an inquiry has found…

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