Lean document processes: Building a faster, more efficient, cost-effective flow of information

MDI Group and Canon America, June 2018

This report calls for a controlled standardised document workflow to increase efficiency and productivity. This will reduce print costs by reducing the needs of a ‘print everything culture’.

Click here to view the full report.

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Start Well: Stay Well – a model to support new starters: Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

NHS Employers, June 2018

The Start Well: Stay Well model formalises the approach to meeting, greeting and supporting all new starters. It engages with new starters at various touch points, including on appointment and before they arrive at CUH as part of the on-boarding process. A key feature of the model was employee buddies; the ambition was that all new starters, clinical and non-clinical, would be assigned a buddy on their first day. The theatres teams embraced this approach and installed photo posters in their areas to ensure named buddies were visible to all.  Integral to the model is a hi-5 moment approach, which comprises of a high impact, high energy, high importance contact with staff which can be delivered in five minutes. This is built around five open questions:

  • How are you today?
  • How is your induction going?
  • How are you settling in?
  • How can the team help?
  • How can I help?

Click here to view the full report.

From prison to work: A new frontier for Individual Placement and Support

Centre for Mental Health, June 2018

From prison to work: A new frontier for Individual Placement and Support reports on a pilot programme in the West Midlands to support prisoners with mental health difficulties into employment when they are released. The programme sought to employ the proven Individual Placement and Support approach from mental health services to the criminal justice system for the first time. It enabled people who would otherwise have had little prospect of paid work to get jobs when they were released from prison as well as providing help with basic needs such as housing and health.

The report finds that the Individual Placement and Support approach can be adapted successfully to support prisoners to get work when they are released. It calls on the Government to invest in a larger scale trial of IPS for former prisoners and to reform existing employment services in the criminal justice system. The report also found that few of the people who had been in contact with prison mental health services as a result of complex needs and vulnerabilities were supported by community mental health services after their release. And many former prisoners got scant help with housing or money despite leaving prison with nowhere to live and no income. It calls on the NHS and probation services to offer more effective, holistic support to former prisoners to support their rehabilitation.

Click here to view the full report.

The health, safety and wellbeing of shift workers in health and social care environments

The NHS Staff Council, March 2018

This guidance has been developed to highlight some of the key health, safety and wellbeing issues associated with shift work; and support managers to work in partnership with union representatives to mitigate the impact on staff and the organisation. Whilst patients are outside the scope of this document, by mitigating the impacts on staff, there is likely to be better  outcomes for patients.

This guidance covers staff under Agenda for Change terms and conditions but can be used to promote best practice in other areas.

Click here to view this guidance.

NHS reality check: Update 2018

Royal College of Physicians, March 2018

Report on a repeat of last years NHS reality check survey which finds doctors struggling against rising demand, the impact of an ageing population with increasingly complex medical needs, and the difficulties of maintaining morale when the NHS is underfunded, under-doctored and overstretched.

Click here to view the full report.

National Minimum Wage: sleep-in care: (Bulletin Number CBP 8243)

House of Commons Library, March 2018

In April 2017 the Employment Appeal Tribunal handed down judgment in Royal Mencap Society v Tomlinson-Blake, providing further guidance on whether employees who undertake sleep-in duties are entitled the National Minimum Wage (NMW) for the time during which they are sleeping. The Tribunal held that, in some cases, carers who are required to be present throughout the night will be entitled to the NMW whether awake or asleep. While this proposition had been established by case law prior to the Mencap case, government guidance had not explained this clearly.

Social care providers have expressed concerns about their ability to meet the requirement to pay carers the NMW during sleep-in shifts. Moreover, many such providers may be exposed to claims for backdated pay.  To obtain backdated wages if underpaid, an employee could take a claim to the employment tribunal or the country court. In addition, the State enforces the NMW. If an employer has breached NMW law, HMRC may take enforcement action.

Following the Mencap decision and the realisation that government guidance had been “potentially misleading”, the Government has set up the Social Care Compliance Scheme and temporarily modified its policy on enforcing the NMW in the social care sector.

Click here to view the full report.

Left to chance: the health and care nursing workforce supply in England

Royal College of Nursing, February 2018

Report from the Royal College of Nursing that finds the current approach to workforce planning in England is fragmented and incomplete, with no clear national accountability for ensuring that nursing staff with the right skills arrive in the right parts of the health care system at the right time. The lack of comprehensive data on current nursing staff and training numbers means that national workforce planning is incoherent, and credible workforce strategy impossible.  It notes that since nurse bursaries were abolished, the 2018 applications to UCAS for nursing courses have seen a 13% fall compared to the same time last year, a total fall of 33% since the same time in January 2016.

Click here to view the report.