Good work, wellbeing and changes in performance outcomes: illustrating the effects of good people management practices with an analysis of the National Health Service

What Works Wellbeing, December 2017

This report illustrates the effect of good people management with an analysis of the National Health Service.  The report found Trusts that made the most extensive use of good people management practices were over three times more likely to have the lowest levels of staff sickness absence and at least four times more likely to have the most satisfied patients. They were also more than twice as likely to have staff with the highest levels of job satisfaction compared to NHS Trusts that made least use of these practices, and over three times more likely to have staff with the highest levels of engagement. No link was found between people management practices and patient mortality.

Click here to view the full report.

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Improving Lives: The Future of Work, Health and Disability

Department of Work and Pensions, December 2017

This paper that establishes how government, employers, charities, healthcare providers and local authorities will work to break down employment barriers for disabled people and people with health conditions over the next ten years. The actions outlined for health services focus on ensuring that health professionals are ready to talk about health barriers to work, timely access to appropriate treatments, and effective occupational health services accessible by all in work.

Click here to view the full report.

Thriving at Work: a review of mental health and employers

Department of Work and Pensions, October 2017

Thriving at Work sets out what employers can do to better support all employees, including those with mental health problems to remain in and thrive through work.

It includes a detailed analysis that explores the significant cost of poor mental health to UK businesses and the economy as a whole. Poor mental health costs employers between £33 billion and £42 billion a year, with an annual cost to the UK economy of between £74 billion and £99 billion.

The review quantifies how investing in supporting mental health at work is good for business and productivity. The most important recommendation is that all employers, regardless of size or industry, should adopt 6 ‘mental health core standards’ that lay basic foundations for an approach to workplace mental health. It also details how large employers and the public sector can develop these standards further through a set of ‘mental health enhanced standards’. The review also makes a series of recommendations to government and other bodies.

Click here to read the full report.

Struggling to cope: mental health staff and services under pressure

UNISON, October 2017

This report by UNISON suggests that reduced funding to mental health services across the UK is leaving staff vulnerable to violence and aggression from patients, and means they cannot provide the level of care needed.  The report is the result of a survey of over 1,000 mental health employees across the UK, who work in a range of roles – with children and adults in hospitals, in secure units and out in the community.

Click here to view the report.

Mental health at work: the business costs ten years on

Centre for Mental Health, September 2017

This report updates a calculation made ten years ago, when mental health problems in the UK workforce were estimated to cost employers almost £26 billion. It finds that the cost is now £34.9 billion as a result of inflation and a rise in the size of the workforce since 2007. This means that mental health problems cost £1,300 for every employee in the UK economy.  The report finds that by far the largest part of the business cost is in the form of reduced productivity among people who are at work but unwell: or ‘presenteeism’. This costs businesses twice as much as sickness absence relating to poor mental health. The remainder of the cost relates to turnover – people leaving their jobs as a result of poor mental health.

Click here to read the full report.

Employment and Mental Health

Royal College of Psychiatrists, April 2017

The Royal College of Psychiatrists has for many years highlighted the importance of mental health and employment.

UK national policy is paying increasing attention to health, mental health and employment. Responding to a growing number of national policies and initiatives, the College has enhanced its coverage of relevant concerns of social psychiatry, mental health and employment.

This report outlines the main priorities and activities of the College in the area of mental health and employment.

Click here to view the report.