Children and young people’s mental health: peer support

Department for Education, March 2017

Summary of evidence examining the effectiveness of peer support for children and young people and its role in supporting mental health.

Click here to view the report.

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Meeting us where we’re at: Learning from INTEGRATE’s work with excluded young people

Centre for Mental Health, March 2017

Research consistently demonstrates that people experiencing material, racial and social disadvantage face poorer life chances. These can include risks to their mental health and becoming caught in cycles of offending.

This briefing summarises an evaluation of three pioneering projects in London developed by MAC-UK. The projects use the INTEGRATE approach, characterised by engaging young people through co-designing and co-delivering projects, and by securing referrals through peers.  The briefing also highlights some wider recommendations to young people’s services based on the research findings, including the value of peer team members and an emphasis on co-production.

Click here to view the briefing.

Improving the mental health of children and young people

Public Health England, December 2016

These reports describe the importance of mental health and wellbeing among children and young people and the case for investment in mental health. They also summarise the evidence of what works to improve mental health among children and young people in order to inform local transformation of services.

Click here to access these reports.

Children and young people’s mental health: Time to deliver – The report of the Independent Commission on Children and Young People’s Mental Health

Educational Policy Institute, November 2016

The report represents the culmination of the Commission’s work over the last year, reflecting on progress made in transforming services following the government’s investment of £1.4bn in Children and young people’s mental health, announced in 2015. Based on its comprehensive research, the report sets out a number of new findings, and proposes a series of recommendations which it urges the government to adopt through the Challenge. This includes an ambitious programme of changes covering research and prevention, early intervention and improving access to quality services.

Click here to view this report.

What Really Matters in Children and Young People’s Mental Health

Children & Young People’s Mental Health Coalition, November 2016

This report is based on the findings of the Values-Based Child and Adolescent Mental Health System Commission, Chaired by Baroness Claire Tyler of Enfield.

The report makes a total of ten recommendations, including calling on governments to formally recognise schools as a crucial component of the Child and Adolescent Mental Health System in the following ways:

  • Schools should be able to teach children and young people about mental health in the same way they teach them about literacy or numeracy
  • Undertake mental health impact assessments to ensure that both schools/education policy and wider government policy and legislation are not detrimental to children and young people’s mental health
  • Ensure that schools are able to identify mental health issues and can easily signpost pupils to relevant support, either within the school or their local community, and have the accountability to do this.

Click here to view the full report.

Leading my life my way: young disabled people’s experiences of using services to live independent lives

Scope, November 2016

This report finds that young disabled people are experiencing poor quality care and support planning, a lack of information and advice tailored to their specific needs and expectations. The report calls for the government to look beyond funding support for the basics in social care to ensure that young disabled people are supported and enabled to live independent lives.

Click here to view the report.

Picture of health? Male representation in advertising & the media, and its effect on young boys

Advertising Association, August 2016

This report focuses on the way male models are portrayed in advertising and the media – particularly, whether boys are aware of digitally enhanced imagery and whether this impacts their behavior.

The researchers surveyed 1,005 boys from primary and secondary schools around the country to explore their attitudes towards advertising and body image, and conducted focus groups of boys aged 8 to 18 and with teachers, youth leaders and parents to understand the roots, effects and solutions to boys body confidence.

Click here to view the full report.