Open Consultation: Health risks from alcohol – new guidelines

Department of Health, January 2016

Seeks views on the UK Chief Medical Officers’ proposed new guidelines to limit the health risks associated with the consumption of alcohol.

At the request of the UK Chief Medical Officers (CMOs), a group of experts were asked to evaluate evidence about the levels and types of health harm that alcohol can cause.  They have produced some recommendations about how health risks can be limited from drinking alcohol.  The UK CMOs considered and accepted the advice of the expert group and are consulting on the following 3 recommendations:
•a weekly guideline on regular drinking
•advice on single episodes of drinking
•a guideline on pregnancy and drinking

The consultation closes on 1st April 2016

Click here for further information and to respond to the consultation.

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Making Every Contact Count – Bulletin

Lancashire Care Library and Information Service

This Library bulletin provides further reading to support the ‘Making Every Contact Count’ programme.

There are links to recent research papers and articles in each of the MECC areas to give you further background information and evidence to consolidate what you have learned in your training, and to give you ideas and confidence for practising MECC in your day-to-day encounters.  The section on smoking cessation includes a Cochrane review about interventions to increase adherence to medications for tobacco dependence and what PHE says about e-cigarettes. There are peer-reviewed articles about different diets for weight loss and a study exploring alcohol intake and cancer risk, as well as articles on how to start a MECC conversation.

Click here to view the bulletin.

You will need to login with your Athens account to view the articles in this bulletin unless it is indicated that they are “Open Access”.  All LCFT staff and students are eligible to register for an Athens account.  Please click here to register for an account or contact the Library.

 

Service user involvement: A guide for drug and alcohol commissioners, providers and service users

Public Health England, September 2015

Public Health England have published a report on service user involvement in drug and alcohol treatment programmes, designed to help commissioners, service providers and service users explore and develop service user involvement in their area. It also includes a series of ‘inspirational’ case studies outlining how different organisations have approached service user involvement.

Click here to view the full report.

Recovering alcohol and drug users leading service planning

Public Health England, September 2015

Public Health England has launched a new guide showing the benefits of involving recovering alcohol and drug users in the design and development of their own, and others treatment and recovery.

PHE’s Service User Involvement guide describes 4 different levels of service user involvement, from co-developing one’s own care plan through to initiating and running recovery-focused enterprises. The guide showcases a number of examples of unique services from across the country that have been set-up by, or run by, former alcohol and drug users.

Click here for further information and to download the guide.

Light to moderate intake of alcohol, drinking patterns, and risk of cancer: results from two prospective US cohort studies

BMJ, 18 August 2015

This study, incorporating two US prospective cohort studies, aims to quantify risk of overall cancer across all levels of alcohol consumption among women and men separately, with a focus on light to moderate drinking and never smokers; and assess the influence of drinking patterns on overall cancer risk.

Click here to access the full text paper.

Long working hours and alcohol use: systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data

BMJ, 13 January 2015

This study aims to quantify the association between long working hours and alcohol use through a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies and unpublished individual participant data.

Cross sectional analysis was based on 61 studies representing 333 693 participants from 14 countries. Prospective analysis was based on 20 studies representing 100 602 participants from nine countries. The pooled maximum adjusted odds ratio for the association between long working hours and alcohol use was 1.11 (95% confidence interval 1.05 to 1.18) in the cross sectional analysis of published and unpublished data. Odds ratio of new onset risky alcohol use was 1.12 (1.04 to 1.20) in the analysis of prospective published and unpublished data. In the 18 studies with individual participant data it was possible to assess the European Union Working Time Directive, which recommends an upper limit of 48 hours a week. Odds ratios of new onset risky alcohol use for those working 49-54 hours and ≥55 hours a week were 1.13 (1.02 to 1.26; adjusted difference in incidence 0.8 percentage points) and 1.12 (1.01 to 1.25; adjusted difference in incidence 0.7 percentage points), respectively, compared with working standard 35-40 hours (incidence of new onset risky alcohol use 6.2%). There was no difference in these associations between men and women or by age or socioeconomic groups, geographical regions, sample type (population based v occupational cohort), prevalence of risky alcohol use in the cohort, or sample attrition rate.

The study concludes that individuals whose working hours exceed standard recommendations are more likely to increase their alcohol use to levels that pose a health risk.

Click here to read the full text article.

Click here to also read the BMJ editorial on this research.

You will need an Athens password to view these articles.  All Lancashire Care staff are eligble to register for an Athens password.  Please click here to register for an Athens password.