Supporting the health and wellbeing of military families

Public Health England, December 2015

Health professionals such as health visitors, midwives and school nursing teams working with stakeholders, including social care, early years and education providers, have a crucial role in identifying children of military families. They can work with parents to improve health outcomes, particularly in terms of emotional health and wellbeing.  This document supports health visitors and school nurses to deliver improved outcomes, and outlines aspirations for service delivery.

Click here to download the guidance.

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Children of the new century: Mental health findings from the Millennium Cohort Study

Centre for Mental Health, December 2015

This report from the Centre for Mental Health finds that about one in ten 11-year-olds in the UK has a mental health problem according to parents – or eight percent as reported by teachers. Children from the lowest income families are four times more likely to have mental health problems than those from the highest earning backgrounds.

Click here for further information and to download the report.

Focus on: Bullying and Mental Health

Anti-Bullying Alliance, December 2015

This briefing paper pulls together the latest findings, both in the UK and internationally, which show how involvement in school bullying, whether as a ‘victim’, ‘bully, or ‘bullyvictim’, is linked to poorer mental health outcomes throughout adolescence and into adulthood.

Click here to read the full report.

Fat chance? Exploring the evidence on who becomes obese

202 Health, November 2015

This report examines current knowledge and data on obesity, addresses the question: ‘Who exactly is becoming obese?’ It shows that many factors, including parental weight, access to green spaces and the safety of roads have a strong influence on obesity rates in children and must be considered.

Click here to read the full report.

Secondhand smoke and incidence of dental caries in deciduous teeth among children in Japan: population based retrospective cohort study

BMJ, 21 October 2015

The aim of this study is to question whether maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure of infants to tobacco smoke at age 4 months increase the risk of caries in deciduous teeth.

Among the findings the study concludes that exposure to tobacco smoke at 4 months of age was associated with an approximately twofold increased risk of caries, and the risk of caries was also increased among those exposed to household smoking, by 1.5-fold, whereas the effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy was not statistically significant.

Click here to access the full text paper.

Poor Beginnings: Health inequalities among young children across England

National Children’s Bureau, September 2015

This report is based on official data published by Public Health England and it looks at four key measures of young children’s health and wellbeing: obesity, tooth decay, accidental injury and school readiness. It picture of the health of children under five years old living in England and shows how growing up in different areas of the country can have an impact on the likelihood of experiencing a poor health outcome before starting school.

Click here to view the full report.