The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry – January 2019

The January edition of Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry has been published.  This issue includes articles on the impact of maternal depression on child psychopathology across the first decade of life and a population‐based birth cohort study on what distinguishes adolescents with suicidal thoughts from those who have attempted suicide.

Click here to view the table of contents.

Click here to request an article from the Library.

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Children’s Mental Health briefing: A briefing by the Office of the Children’s Commissioner for England

Office of the Children’s Commissioner for England, November 2018

Report that finds improvement in the provision of child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) in most areas in the country, yet with the exception of eating disorder services, the provision of services in the youth justice system and in perinatal mental health care, the rate of progress is slow. A vast gap remains between what is provided and what children need. As a result, the current rate of progress is still not good enough for the majority of children who require help but are not receiving it. Main findings include:

  • Of more than 338,000 children referred to CAMHS last year, less than a third (31%) received treatment within the year.
  • Another 37% were not accepted into treatment or discharged after an assessment appointment, and 32% were still on waiting lists at the end of the year.
  • Less than 3% of children in England accessed CAMHS last year, a small fraction of those who need help. This is partly because many children who seek help are not accepted into treatment, but also because many children do not know they have a problem or do not seek help.
  • Of those children who did enter treatment, around half did so within six weeks.
    However, nearly 80% of children entering eating disorders treatment are seen within four weeks.
  • Most areas are increasing funding for CAMHS, but parity with spending on adult mental health services remains a distant prospect. Nearly fifteen times as much is spent on adult mental health as on child mental health.
  • In cash terms this means children’s mental health services require an additional £1.7bn a year to achieve equivalent funding to that provided to adult mental health
  • Some areas are already far exceeding the existing NHS target to be treating a third of children with significant need (based on 2004 levels of prevalence) by 2021. Yet for every area exceeding what NHS England expects of them, there is an area failing to deliver.

Click here to view the full report.

Improving children and young people’s mental health services

National Audit Office, October 2018

This report forms part of The National Audit Office’s wider programme of work on mental health, following their 2016 report Mental health services: preparations for access and our 2017 report Mental health in prisons. It examines whether the government is on track to meet its ambitions for children and young people’s services, taking Future in Mind as the starting point.  It has a focus in particular on how the government decided to implement Future in Mind; whether it is on track to deliver improved mental health services to young people; and accountability for spending and outcomes.  It finds the government has not yet set out or costed what it must do to realise these aspirations in full and there remains limited visibility of activity and spending outside the health sector. While the NHS has worked to improve information on its activity and spending, significant data weaknesses are hampering its understanding of progress. Slow progress on workforce expansion to deliver NHS services is also emerging as a major risk to delivery.  It calls for the government to ensure a coherent and coordinated cross-sector response, and that the right levers are in place to ensure local actions deliver the national ambitions. It has started to tackle issues of parity of esteem between physical and mental health services for children and young people, but it still has a long way to go, particularly as demand may be higher than originally thought, and an increased focus on mental health may uncover greater demand. Given these weaknesses and uncertainties, we conclude that the government cannot demonstrate that it has yet delivered value for money.

Click here to view the full report.

Access to children and young people’s mental health services: 2018

Education Policy Institute, October 2018

Report from the the Education Policy Institute considering the  state of child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) in England.  It finds:

  • Referrals to child and adolescent mental health services have risen significantly in recent years.
  • Some areas have lost early intervention services supporting children and young people’s emotional and mental health and wellbeing, including those for children that receive statutory support.
  • Timely and high-quality specialist care will always be necessary, and more needs to be done to ensure it is in place across the country.
  • There needs to be a focus on taking demand out of the system.

Click here to view the full report.

Rapid Evidence Review Series: Effective pathway from child to adult mental health services: (LPHO Report Series, number 102: Rapid Evidence Review Series, number 5)

Liverpool University Public Health Observatory, August 2018

Although there is evidence that young people aged 12-25 years have the highest levels of mental illness across the lifespan, access to mental health services is the poorest of all age groups. This rapid evidence review presents the evidence of gaps in transition from child to adult mental health services and evidence of effective solutions.

Click here to view the full report.

Transforming children and young people’s mental health provision: a green paper

Department for Health and Social Care, July 2018

This is the government’s response to the consultation on ‘Transforming children and young people’s mental health provision: a green paper’.  The consultation period lasted 13 weeks from December 2017 to March 2018 and received over 2,700 responses. The response sets out what was heard over the course of the consultation; the government’s response to respondents’ views; next steps for implementing the green paper’s proposals.

Click here to access the original documents and report.

 

 

Investigation Into The Transition From Child And Adolescent Mental Health Services To Adult Mental Health Services

Healthcare Safety Investigation Bureau, July 2018

Reviews the transition from children and adolescent mental health services to understand how variations in the transition impacts the safe and effective care of young people. It makes a number of recommendations to national NHS organisations to make the transition smoother and safer for young people.

Click here to view the full report.