Children and young people’s mental health: peer support

Department for Education, March 2017

Summary of evidence examining the effectiveness of peer support for children and young people and its role in supporting mental health.

Click here to view the report.

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Fatherhood: the impact of fathers on children’s mental health

Centre for Mental Health, February 2017

This briefing reviews evidence about the role of fathers in children’s mental health. It finds evidence that fathers have a big influence on their children’s mental health yet few get any help or support to fulfil their potential as parents.

Click here to view the briefing.

These are our children: a review by Dame Christine Lenehan

Department of Health, January 2017

Dame Christine Lenehan was asked by the Department of Health to take a strategic overview and recommend what practical action can be taken to co-ordinate care, support and treatment for children and young people with complex needs (and behaviour that challenges) involving mental health problems and learning disabilities and/or autism.

This report makes 11 recommendations for government departments and partners at a national level on how to improve the system.

Click here to view the report.

Improving the mental health of children and young people

Public Health England, December 2016

These reports describe the importance of mental health and wellbeing among children and young people and the case for investment in mental health. They also summarise the evidence of what works to improve mental health among children and young people in order to inform local transformation of services.

Click here to view the reports.

Children and young people’s mental health: Time to deliver – The report of the Independent Commission on Children and Young People’s Mental Health

Educational Policy Institute, November 2016

The report represents the culmination of the Commission’s work over the last year, reflecting on progress made in transforming services following the government’s investment of £1.4bn in Children and young people’s mental health, announced in 2015. Based on its comprehensive research, the report sets out a number of new findings, and proposes a series of recommendations which it urges the government to adopt through the Challenge. This includes an ambitious programme of changes covering research and prevention, early intervention and improving access to quality services.

Click here to view this report.

What Really Matters in Children and Young People’s Mental Health

Children & Young People’s Mental Health Coalition, November 2016

This report is based on the findings of the Values-Based Child and Adolescent Mental Health System Commission, Chaired by Baroness Claire Tyler of Enfield.

The report makes a total of ten recommendations, including calling on governments to formally recognise schools as a crucial component of the Child and Adolescent Mental Health System in the following ways:

  • Schools should be able to teach children and young people about mental health in the same way they teach them about literacy or numeracy
  • Undertake mental health impact assessments to ensure that both schools/education policy and wider government policy and legislation are not detrimental to children and young people’s mental health
  • Ensure that schools are able to identify mental health issues and can easily signpost pupils to relevant support, either within the school or their local community, and have the accountability to do this.

Click here to view the full report.

The Damage of Debt: The impact of money worries on children’s mental health and well-being

The Children’s Society, September 2016

The aim of this report is to provide fresh insights on how low well-being and poor mental health in children are linked to household poverty and problem debt; and to explore the views of children and parents who live in low income households with debt problems on how their family’s financial situation affects their well-being and mental health.  The report makes recommendations to address these issues.

Click here to read the full report.