Accessible Information Standard comes in to force

NHS England, August 2016

The Accessible Information Standard came into force on 1st August 2016 to ensure that people with disabilities receive easily accessible information and support.

The Accessible Information Standard aims to ensure that people who have a disability, impairment or sensory loss are provided with information that they can easily read or understand with support so they can communicate effectively with services. Examples of the types of support that might be required include large print, braille or using a British Sign Language (BSL) interpreter.

All organisations that provide NHS care or adult social care are required to follow the new standard, including NHS Trusts and Foundation Trusts, and GP practices.

Click here for further information and to access guidance documents.

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Disability and domestic abuse: risk, impacts and response

Public Health England, November 2015

This report improves understanding of the complexities of disabled people’s experiences of domestic abuse and promotes consideration of these complexities within the public health system. It also supports local and national action, and provides guidance to improve response across local authorities, health and social care services, clinical commissioners, domestic abuse services, disability services, police and crime commissioners and the wider public health system

Click here to read the report.

Dementia, rights, and the social model of disability

Mental Health Foundation, September 2015

This paper describes the social model of disability in relation to dementia, as well as national and international law that is informed by it or that it connects with. It goes on to describe tools that can be used to apply the model through policy, practice, service and community development.
Using the social model of disability has implications for the rights of people with dementia under the law, for disability discourse and public policy, and for how dementia is experienced and perceived by people with dementia and their carers, as well as how it is viewed and discussed in public.

Click here to download the paper.