Experience of Psychosocial Formulation within a Biopsychosocial Model of Care for First- Episode Psychosis

INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PSYCHOSOCIAL REHABILITATION 19(2):47-62 · OCTOBER 2015

Dr Victoria Cairns, Dr Graeme Reid, Dr Craig Murray, Dr Stephen Weatherhead.

Dr Graeme Reid, Consultant Clinical Psychologist at Lancashire Care, has co-authored this paper.  The study aims to explore the experience of people with first episode psychosis engaging with a process of psychosocial formulation whilst also being supported by clinicians representing a biological understanding of psychosis.

Click here to read the full text paper.

This article is Open Access.

 

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The HELPER programme: HEalthy Living and Prevention of Early Relapse – three exploratory randomised controlled trials of phase-specific interventions in first-episode psychosis.

Marshall M, Barrowclough C, Drake R, Husain N, Lobban F, Lovell K, Wearden A, Bradshaw T, Day C, Fitzsimmons M, Pedley R, Piccuci R, Picken A, Larkin W, Tomenson B, Warburton J, Gregg L.

Programme Grants for Applied Research; Vol. 3, No. 2.

Schizophrenia represents a substantial cost to the NHS and society because it is common (lifetime prevalence around 0.5–1%); it begins in adolescence or early adulthood and often causes lifelong impairment. The first 3 years are a ‘critical period’ in which the course of the illness is determined. Hence under the NHS Plan, specialist early intervention in psychosis services were established to care for people who develop psychosis between the ages of 14 and 35 years for the first 3 years of their illness. However, there has been a lack of evidence-based treatments specifically designed for the early years. This is important because emerging evidence has shown that in the critical period it is vital to avoid relapse and prevent deterioration in physical health, as both can drastically reduce the chances of a full recovery….

Congratulations to Prof Max Marshall, Mike Fitzsimmons and Warren Larkin of LCFT on the publication of this new research.

Click here to access the full text paper.