Frontline pharmacists: making a difference for people with long term conditions

Royal Pharmaceutical Society, November 2016

This report argues that community pharmacists should be able to routinely prescribe medicines for people with long term conditions and refer them directly to other healthcare professionals to ease the overwhelming demand facing the NHS.  Care for people with long term conditions, such as such as diabetes or asthma, currently accounts for 50% of all GP appointments, 64% of all outpatient appointments 70% of all health and social care spending.

The RPS is calling for a change in policy regarding the training of prescribers to enable more pharmacists to become prescribers. This means they could take on the management of patients whose condition is stable but require regular monitoring and alteration of their medicines to stay well, so keeping them out of hospital or GP surgeries.

Click here to view the report.

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Role of pharmacists is set to grow and grow– Dr Keith Ridge

NHS England, 15 September 2015

The Chief Pharmaceutical Officer for NHS England gave this clear message to the Royal Pharmaceutical Society Annual Conference 2015: Over the years, pharmacy across all sectors has contributed much to society. From its apothecary roots enabling anyone to have access to healthcare, to scientific endeavour that underpins much of pharmaceutical discovery and development, to innovating to deliver best care for patients….

Click here to read the full story.

GPs and pharmacists invited to webinars on £15 million clinical pharmacy pilot scheme

NHS England, August 2015

NHS England, the Royal Pharmaceutical Society and other partners in the GP Workforce 10 Point Plan are organising a series of webinars and events to help GP practices and pharmacists understand more about its clinical pharmacists in general practice pilot.

This innovative new scheme will introduce around 250 clinical pharmacists into general practices. GP practices and group of practices are invited to bid for funding as part of the £15 million pilot.

Click here for further information.

New language ability checks for EU trained healthcare workers

Department of Health, 30 January 2015

The Department of Health have published their response to a consultation on changes to allow professional regulatory bodies to impose language controls on nursing, dental and pharmacy professionals. The vast majority of the 71 responses received support proposals to allow these regulators the power to apply language controls, where appropriate, to healthcare professionals, to ensure they have a sufficient knowledge of the English language to practise safely in the UK.

The amendment Order will be laid in Parliament shortly, which, subject to Parliamentary approval, should be in place by March 2015.

Following another public consultation the regulators will then work to implement these changes through amendments to their rules. The new procedures will come into effect later this year.

Click here to view the consultation response.

 

Language controls for nurses, midwives, dentists, dental care professionals, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians

Department of Health, November 2014

The Department of Health has launched a consultation seeking views on changes to allow professional regulatory bodies to impose language controls on nursing, dental and pharmacy professionals.

The 4 UK Health Departments (England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland) want to amend legislation to protect patients from risk associated with the poor English language skills of a minority of health care professionals.

The law currently allows language checks on overseas non-European applicants and on doctors from the European economic area.

Proposed changes will allow the Nursing and Midwifery Council, General Dental Council, General Pharmaceutical Council and Pharmaceutical Society of Northern Ireland to put in place systems for carrying out proportionate language controls on European applicants and for taking fitness to practise action where there are concerns about the English language skills of professionals who are already in practice. The changes will apply to nurses, midwives, dentists, dental care professionals, pharmacists and pharmacy technicians.

The consultation closes on 15 December 2014.

Click here for further information.