Inspire, Attract And Recruit: An Interactive Toolkit To Support Your Workforce Supply

NHS Employers, December 2018

NHS Employers toolkit offering guidance, good practice, checklists, top tips, questions and leading examples from across the NHS, to help employers take stock of what may need to be done to sustain a workforce pipeline. It aims to provide practical information on understanding audiences, how to attract the right people and ensuring employees have the best on-boarding experience.

Click here to view the toolkit.

Fair care: A workforce strategy for social care

Institute for Public Policy Research, December 2018

Adult social care is an essential public service and a growing part of our economy. However, the social care system in England faces a workforce crisis which is set to grow in the coming years; by 2028, we estimate there will be a shortage of over 400,000 workers in social care.

The challenges of recruiting and retaining workers in the sector is inextricably linked to low pay and poor working conditions. This is itself related to the under-funding of social care and a commissioning and delivery model based on cost not quality. Providers have competed by driving down pay and conditions, and they have faced little resistance given the limited bargaining power of the workforce and the limited enforcement of employment rights. These factors are combining to create a social care workforce crisis.

The solution is a sustainable long-term funding settlement for social care and a transformation of the social care workforce model. This should be based on the establishment of decent pay and terms and conditions through sectoral collective bargaining, and a professionalisation of the social care workforce. These measures would help ensure high-quality work for care workers, and high-quality care for those who need it.

Click here to view the full report.

Care staffing in the NHS: the good, the bad and the promising

BPP University School of Nursing, December 2018

Report from BPP University School of Nursing looking at nurse recruitment. It finds while it is clear that NHS trusts are having to deal with budgetary pressures and a skills shortage which may be exacerbated by Brexit, they are also facing significant changes to their traditional training models. This includes factors such as cuts to bursaries and the declining numbers of those applying for nursing degrees.

Click here to view the full report.

Start Well: Stay Well – a model to support new starters: Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

NHS Employers, June 2018

The Start Well: Stay Well model formalises the approach to meeting, greeting and supporting all new starters. It engages with new starters at various touch points, including on appointment and before they arrive at CUH as part of the on-boarding process. A key feature of the model was employee buddies; the ambition was that all new starters, clinical and non-clinical, would be assigned a buddy on their first day. The theatres teams embraced this approach and installed photo posters in their areas to ensure named buddies were visible to all.  Integral to the model is a hi-5 moment approach, which comprises of a high impact, high energy, high importance contact with staff which can be delivered in five minutes. This is built around five open questions:

  • How are you today?
  • How is your induction going?
  • How are you settling in?
  • How can the team help?
  • How can I help?

Click here to view the full report.