Secondhand smoke and incidence of dental caries in deciduous teeth among children in Japan: population based retrospective cohort study

BMJ, 21 October 2015

The aim of this study is to question whether maternal smoking during pregnancy and exposure of infants to tobacco smoke at age 4 months increase the risk of caries in deciduous teeth.

Among the findings the study concludes that exposure to tobacco smoke at 4 months of age was associated with an approximately twofold increased risk of caries, and the risk of caries was also increased among those exposed to household smoking, by 1.5-fold, whereas the effect of maternal smoking during pregnancy was not statistically significant.

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Smoking cessation and reduction in people with chronic mental illness

BMJ, 21 September 2015

The high prevalence of cigarette smoking and tobacco related morbidity and mortality in people with chronic mental illness is well documented. This review summarizes results from studies of smoking cessation treatments in people with schizophrenia, depression, anxiety disorders, and post-traumatic stress disorder. It also summarizes experimental studies aimed at identifying biopsychosocial mechanisms that underlie the high smoking rates seen in people with these disorders.

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Health Matters: Smoking and Quitting in England

Public Health England, 15 September 2015

Smoking and quitting in England is the first of a planned series of resources that will help make the case for effective public health interventions.  The resource will bring together in one easily accessible package local and national level data, policy and programme expertise, as well as campaigning and social marketing resources – all presented in an easy-to-use, engaging format, that will help make the case for effective public health interventions.

Click here for further information.

E-cigarettes: an evidence update

Public Health England, August 2015

This expert independent evidence review published by Public Health England (PHE) concludes that e-cigarettes are significantly less harmful to health than tobacco and have the potential to help smokers quit smoking.

Key findings of the review include:

•the current best estimate is that e-cigarettes are around 95% less harmful than smoking
•nearly half the population (44.8%) don’t realise e-cigarettes are much less harmful than smoking
•there is no evidence so far that e-cigarettes are acting as a route into smoking for children or non-smokers

Click here to download the full report and a paper on the implications for policy and practice.

Impact of smoking and smoking cessation on cardiovascular events and mortality among older adults: meta-analysis of individual participant data from prospective cohort studies of the CHANCES consortium

BMJ, 20 April 2015

This study aims to investigate the impact of smoking and smoking cessation on cardiovascular mortality, acute coronary events, and stroke events in people aged 60 and older, and to calculate and report risk advancement periods for cardiovascular mortality in addition to traditional epidemiological relative risk measures.  The study was designed as an individual participant meta-analysis using data from 25 cohorts participating in the CHANCES consortium.

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E-cigarette vapour could damage health of non-smokers

British Medical Journal, 17 November 2014

Particles in secondhand vapour from e-cigarettes have the potential to damage the health of non-smokers, a study by environmental scientists presented at the e-cigarette summit in London on 13 November has found…

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E-cigarettes–aid to smoking cessation or smokescreen?

The Lancet, September 2014

Over the GBD period 1990-2010, smoking-related deaths globally are estimated to have increased by 18%.  The recent US National Youth Tobacco Survey showed a dramatic increase in young people using e-cigarettes, from 79 000 in 2011, to 263 000 in 2013.  Accidental or deliberate ingestion of e-cigarette liquids can lead to acute nicotine toxicity, and deaths of children have been reported.

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