Study Skills Reading List

Lancashire Care Library and Information Service, September 2017

Are you starting a new course this September?  Has it been a while since you did any studying or wrote an essay?  Have a look at the new reading topic for Study Skills which will point you in the direction of useful books and resources to help you develop your skills.

Click here to view the Study Skills Reading Topic.

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Inactivity ‘kills more than obesity’

BBC News, 15 January 2015

A lack of exercise could be killing twice as many people as obesity in Europe, a 12-year study of more than 300,000 people suggests.

University of Cambridge researchers said about 676,000 deaths each year were down to inactivity, compared with 337,000 from carrying too much weight….

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Exercise can help people to recover from PTSD, report says

Mental Health Today, 9 December 2014

Structured exercise including resistance training and walking helps people to recover from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as well as other mental health conditions, an Australian study has revealed…

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E-cigarettes–aid to smoking cessation or smokescreen?

The Lancet, September 2014

Over the GBD period 1990-2010, smoking-related deaths globally are estimated to have increased by 18%.  The recent US National Youth Tobacco Survey showed a dramatic increase in young people using e-cigarettes, from 79 000 in 2011, to 263 000 in 2013.  Accidental or deliberate ingestion of e-cigarette liquids can lead to acute nicotine toxicity, and deaths of children have been reported.

Click here to view the full text article.

Potential benefits of minimum unit pricing for alcohol versus a ban on below cost selling in England 2014: modelling study

BMJ, 30 September 2014

An article to evaluate the potential impact of two alcohol control policies under consideration in England: banning below cost selling of alcohol and minimum unit pricing. 

The results of the study show that the proportion of the market affected is a key driver of impact, with just 0.7% of all units estimated to be sold below the duty plus value added tax threshold implied by a ban on below cost selling, compared with 23.2% of units for a 45p minimum unit price. Below cost selling is estimated to reduce harmful drinkers’ mean annual consumption by just 0.08%, around 3 units per year, compared with 3.7% or 137 units per year for a 45p minimum unit price (an approximately 45 times greater effect). The ban on below cost selling has a small effect on population health—saving an estimated 14 deaths and 500 admissions to hospital per annum. In contrast, a 45p minimum unit price is estimated to save 624 deaths and 23 700 hospital admissions. Most of the harm reductions (for example, 89% of estimated deaths saved per annum) are estimated to occur in the 5.3% of people who are harmful drinkers.

The study concludes that the ban on below cost selling, implemented in the England in May 2014, is estimated to have small effects on consumption and health harm. The previously announced policy of a minimum unit price, if set at expected levels between 40p and 50p per unit, is estimated to have an approximately 40-50 times greater effect.

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Far more non-smoking US students are trying e-cigarettes, figures show

British Medical Journal, 29 August 2014

The number of middle and high school students in the United States who have tried electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) despite never using regular cigarettes increased threefold from 2011 to 2013, a new report has found.

The study by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,1 published online on 20 August in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research, reported that 263 000 non-smoking students tried e-cigarettes in 2013, compared with just 79 000 in 2011.

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Parents who refuse vitamin K for newborns are also likely to refuse vaccinations, Canadian study finds

The British Medical Journal, 21 August 2014

Parents who declined vitamin K prophylaxis for their newborns were more likely to have had their child at home, to have had the child delivered by a midwife, and subsequently to decline to have their children vaccinated, a Canadian study has found…

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