National Health Servers: delivering digital health for all

Social Market Foundation, May 2019

This report looks at how technology could be adopted quicker and more widely by the NHS to improve the care that patients receive and to drive better health outcomes.  The report  tracks the patient journey, from prevention and diagnosis in the community, into primary and secondary care, through into management of long-term conditions. As well as improving the care experience in primary and secondary care, the report argues that there are huge opportunities to keep patients out of the NHS: prevention of disease can reduce the likelihood of people having to enter hospital care in the first place; better digital management of long-term conditions can help avoid unnecessary readmissions into hospital.

Click here to view the full report.

Preparing the healthcare workforce to deliver the digital future

Health Education England, February 2019

This is the report of the findings of the Topol Review, led by Dr Eric Topol.  The review explored how to prepare the healthcare workforce, through education and training, to deliver the digital future.  The report looks at how technological and other developments are likely to change the roles and functions of clinical staff, and investigates the skills that will be needed for these roles and how health education will need to adapt to facilitate this.

Click here to view the full report.

Our data-driven future in healthcare: People and partnerships at the heart of health related technologies

Academy of Medical Sciences, December 2018

New data-driven technologies, powered by novel ways of linking and analysing patient data, are set to transform the way that health and social care is delivered as well as the ways in which we manage our own health. Technologies such as wearable devices, mobile apps and intelligent monitoring devices that use machine learning, provide an opportunity for the NHS to harness the breadth and depth of patient data that it holds to support a healthier future for patients and the public. This report outlines a set of principles based on dialogues with patients, the public and healthcare professionals, for the development, evaluation and deployment of data-driven technologies in healthcare. Embedding these principles will be essential if we are to realise the anticipated benefits of these innovative technologies whilst maintaining trust in their use in health and social care sectors. Central to this are meaningful partnerships with patients and the public and their health and care professionals.

Click here to view the full report.

Initial code of conduct for data-driven health and care technology

Department of Health and Social Care, September 2018

This code provides clarification of:

  • what is expected from suppliers of data-driven technologies
  • what the government will do to support and encourage innovators in health and care, including the development of trusted approval systems and a coherent pathway for suppliers to enter the market

The code provides the basis for ongoing engagement and conversation on how we should use new technology to provide better and more sustainable services, with:

  • our partners in academia, industry and the health and care system
  • patients
  • clinicians
  • the wider public

The code provides the basis for the health and care system and suppliers of digital technology to enter into commercial terms in which the benefits of the partnerships between technology companies and health and care providers are shared fairly.

Click here to view the code.

Mersey Care advancing suicide prevention app

digitalhealth, June 2017

Mersey Care NHS Foundation Trust is advancing in its plans to develop an app which anticipates and responds to suicide risk.  The mental health trust has been working with California’s Stanford University to  develop the application.  A prototype has been created and researchers are now preparing a feasibility study to explore the usability and performance of the digital platform.  Mersey Care chief executive Joe Rafferty told Digital Health News that the app will offer a more sophisticated way of identifying those who may be at risk of suicide.

Click here to view this news story.