Learning from the vanguards: staff at the heart of new care models –

NHS Clinical Commissioners, February 2018

This briefing looks at what the vanguards set out to achieve when it comes to involving and engaging staff in the new care models. It highlights the work some of the vanguards have been doing and shares the lessons that other organisations and partnerships can take from the vanguards’ experiences.

Click here to view this report.

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The risks to care quality and staff wellbeing of an NHS system under pressure

The Picker Institute, February 2018

Report  jointly authored by The Picker Institute and The King’s Fund on the impact of pressure on staff as a result of the current pressures on the NHS.  It finds that staff experience was associated with sickness absence rates, spend on agency staff and staffing levels. This indicates that staff wellbeing is impacted negatively by a workforce that is overstretched and supplemented by temporary staff. The consequence of this is that patient experience is also negatively associated with workforce factors: higher spend on agency staff, fewer doctors and especially fewer nurses per bed, and bed occupancy results in a poorer patient experience.

Click here to view this report.

Left to chance: the health and care nursing workforce supply in England

Royal College of Nursing, February 2018

Report from the Royal College of Nursing that finds the current approach to workforce planning in England is fragmented and incomplete, with no clear national accountability for ensuring that nursing staff with the right skills arrive in the right parts of the health care system at the right time. The lack of comprehensive data on current nursing staff and training numbers means that national workforce planning is incoherent, and credible workforce strategy impossible.  It notes that since nurse bursaries were abolished, the 2018 applications to UCAS for nursing courses have seen a 13% fall compared to the same time last year, a total fall of 33% since the same time in January 2016.

Click here to view the report.

The Nursing Workforce

House of Commons Select Committee, January 2018

This report argues that too little attention has been given to retaining nurses in the NHS, which has resulted in more nurses now leaving than joining the professional register. It identifies various factors for the cause of the shortfall of nurses in the NHS including workload pressures, poor access to continuing professional development, pay and a general sense of being undervalued.

Click here to view the report.

Retaining your clinical staff: a practical improvement resource

NHS Improvement, December 2017

This improvement resource outlines key steps to improving retention of clinical staff. It has distilled our advice from interviews with trust HR directors, directors of nursing and medical directors.  It recognises that no one action will boost retention on its own – sustained action in several areas is needed. It also acknowledges that external factors like private sector wage growth, the strength of the pound and the increasing demands of a clinical role in the NHS all make it difficult to retain staff.  Despite this there are factors in trusts’ control and trusts are exploiting these in their efforts to improve retention. These factors are covered in this resource.

Click here to view the resource.

Horizon scanning future health and care demand for workforce skills in England, UK: Noncommunicable disease and future skills implications

World Health Organization, December 2017

World Health Organization Horizon Scan of good practice on workforce planning in in the UK that finds:

  • Investigation of skills mix and future demand for the whole system can reveal new ways of thinking and planning.
  • Small annual changes in demand can add up to larger changes over time requiring major shifts in the skills and competencies of the health workforce.
  • It is important to understand the context of the system to be investigated, ensuring that the appropriate scope, level of enquiry and methods are selected.
  • It pays off to experiment with a range of techniques and approaches to accommodate variation in systems.
  • Ensure that stakeholders are involved at every stage of the workforce review, including modelling and validation of variables.

The Centre for Workforce Intelligence, mapped out necessary skills and competencies for the health and care workforce, investigated roles and responsibilities for different health and care workers, and outlined 6 scenarios for change in future demand.

Click here to view the briefing.