The health care workforce in England: make or break?

The King’s Fund, November 2018

This briefing highlights the scale of workforce challenges now facing the health service and the threat this poses to the delivery and quality of care over the next 10 years. It sets out the reasons why the NHS long-term plan and supporting workforce strategy must address the urgent and mounting challenges facing the health care workforce.

Click here to view the report.

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Towards commissioning for workplace compassion: a support guide

NHS England, October 2018

This interactive guide aims to assist with commissioning for compassion, providing support via case study examples from healthcare organisations who have good practice to share.

Click here to view the full report.

Your Future Nurses: The Different Routes To Recruiting Your Workforce

NHS Employers, August 2018

NHS Employers infographic exploring different routes into nursing for employers. Until recently, the routes to developing registered nurses within the workforce have been limited, with the university degree being the main way to train this group of staff. The introduction of the nursing degree apprenticeship gives a new opportunity for employers to train nurses, while the creation of the new nursing associate role can help to be a bridge between healthcare assistants and graduate registered nurses.

Click here to view the infographic.

Global strategy on human resources for health: Workforce 2030

World Health Organization, July 2018

The Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health: Workforce 2030 is primarily aimed at planners and policy-makers of WHO Member States, but its contents are of value to all relevant stakeholders in the health workforce area, including public and private sector employers, professional associations, education and training institutions, labour unions, bilateral and multilateral development partners, international organizations, and civil society.

Click here to view the full report.

Start Well: Stay Well – a model to support new starters: Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

NHS Employers, June 2018

The Start Well: Stay Well model formalises the approach to meeting, greeting and supporting all new starters. It engages with new starters at various touch points, including on appointment and before they arrive at CUH as part of the on-boarding process. A key feature of the model was employee buddies; the ambition was that all new starters, clinical and non-clinical, would be assigned a buddy on their first day. The theatres teams embraced this approach and installed photo posters in their areas to ensure named buddies were visible to all.  Integral to the model is a hi-5 moment approach, which comprises of a high impact, high energy, high importance contact with staff which can be delivered in five minutes. This is built around five open questions:

  • How are you today?
  • How is your induction going?
  • How are you settling in?
  • How can the team help?
  • How can I help?

Click here to view the full report.

Learning from the vanguards: staff at the heart of new care models –

NHS Clinical Commissioners, February 2018

This briefing looks at what the vanguards set out to achieve when it comes to involving and engaging staff in the new care models. It highlights the work some of the vanguards have been doing and shares the lessons that other organisations and partnerships can take from the vanguards’ experiences.

Click here to view this report.

The risks to care quality and staff wellbeing of an NHS system under pressure

The Picker Institute, February 2018

Report  jointly authored by The Picker Institute and The King’s Fund on the impact of pressure on staff as a result of the current pressures on the NHS.  It finds that staff experience was associated with sickness absence rates, spend on agency staff and staffing levels. This indicates that staff wellbeing is impacted negatively by a workforce that is overstretched and supplemented by temporary staff. The consequence of this is that patient experience is also negatively associated with workforce factors: higher spend on agency staff, fewer doctors and especially fewer nurses per bed, and bed occupancy results in a poorer patient experience.

Click here to view this report.